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Win Up to $250 with the ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship!

Round Two of the 2016-2017 ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship is open! Submit your application by Friday, March 31st, 2017!

The ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarships may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (check out previous scholarship winners). All ACRL-Oregon members may apply. Please visit our scholarship page as well as our FAQ, which contains more information on the evaluation process. To apply, use the online form.

Questions? Contact the ACRL-OR Board President:
Stephanie Debner
ACRL-OR President, 2016-2017
stephanie.debner@mhcc.edu
Mt. Hood Community College

Join ACRL-OR!

Attention ACRL Oregon Members:
Looking for an opportunity to get more involved with an active professional organization and to work with a great group of people? Run for a position in ACRL-OR’s upcoming spring election.

The open positions are:

To nominate yourself please fill out this form that includes the following information:

  • Your name.
  • Your present position–list your title, the name of the library and college or university and the dates of employment.
  • Previous positions, if desired–list no more than two, the most recent first.
  • Your education–list institutions attended, degrees conferred, and dates awarded.
  • Professional activities, such as memberships and positions held in national, state and/or regional library organizations (indicate name of organization, offices held and dates of service).
  • Honors, special projects, publications, and/or presentations–list no more than two recent examples of each of these.
  • Candidates for Vice President/President Elect also need to include a Candidates’ Statement explaining why you would like to be elected, which should be no more than 200 words

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and national ACRL
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

To nominate someone else, email that person’s name and contact information to Steve Silver (ssilver@nwcu.edu) or Molly Gunderson (mgun2@pdx.edu)

 

A Renaissance for the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection

The OSU Libraries’ Library Faculty Association invites colleagues and friends to the February 2017 Seminar Series Presentation: A Renaissance for the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection, with Dr. Brian Lee Sidlauskas, Associate Professor in OSU’s Department of Fisheries & Wildlife and Curator of the Ichthyology Collection. The seminar will be on February 24th from 10:00am-11:30am.

The Oregon State Ichthyology Collection (OSIC), which contains approximately a quarter million preserved fish specimens, has been a major center of research and education on the biology of fishes since its establishment in 1935.  Despite continued scientific use, the OSIC’s physical facilities declined in the late 20th century due to a lack of space for growth and insufficient funding.  Simultaneously, a lack of computerization discouraged researchers elsewhere from accessing its specimens.  Curator Brian Sidlauskas will discuss how we restored the scientific and educational value of the OSIC, and highlight recent science using the collection.  One component of the restoration upgraded the collections’ physical facilities by installing mobile compact shelving in a renovated space that now meets modern fire and earthquake safety codes. We also upgraded the collection’s digital presence by modernizing the collection’s catalog of specimens and making the holdings searchable online at ichthyology.oregonstate.edu. Through the completion of this project, one of the most important libraries of ichthyological diversity on the west coast of the US is again stable, safe, properly curated, and accessible to the world’s community of scientists. It regularly accessions new specimens, loans material to researchers at other institutions, hosts researchers from around the world, and supports research and teaching on taxonomy, genetics, biogeography, parasitology, evolution, ecology and conservation biology.

Brian Lee Sidlauskas is an associate professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University.  The son of a fisherman and an art teacher, he grew up along the coast of historic Salem, Massachusetts.  As an ichthyologist, Dr. Sidlauskas works to help reveal and protect the world’s tremendous biodiversity of fishes.  He teaches courses dealing with ichthyology, systematics, biodiversity and conservation biology, and his research seeks to understand the evolution, ecology and diversity of freshwater fishes on scales ranging from local to global. He achieved a measure of internet fame for his use of Facebook to community source fish identifications from photographs. Dr. Sidlauskas has involved nearly two dozen undergraduates in the research and management of the quarter-million preserved fishes in the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection, which he curates.  In 2014 he was named OSU’s Undergraduate Mentor of the Year.

The seminar will take place in the Autzen classroom on the main (2nd) floor of the Valley Library (Valley 2082). Light refreshments will be provided. Please contact Beth.Filar-Williams@oregonstate.edu or Uta.Hussong-Christian@oregonstate.edu with any questions. Library visitor info (including campus map and parking info can be found online: http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/visit)

Can We Do That? Intellectual Property Rights and Visual Media

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) is pleased to announce that Can We Do That?: Intellectual Property Rights and Visual Media, will be held  on Thursday, March 30, 2017 at Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA). This workshop will be co-hosted by the PNCA and the University of Oregon Libraries, and is open to cultural heritage professionals, the information and educational communities, and to anyone interested in visual culture. Can We Do That? is one of four workshops being offered in the second year of the VRAF Regional Workshop Program.  The VRAF is grateful to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for their continued support of this exciting opportunity to partner with cultural heritage and educational institutions.

A thorough understanding of intellectual property rights can be a challenge for lawyers, let alone for information, academic, and cultural heritage professionals, and the application of copyright restrictions on visual media can induce a sense of alarm and uncertainty dependent upon specific circumstances. This workshop will provide a clear focus on U.S. copyright law, intellectual property rights, and fair use as they pertain to the use of visual media (e.g., images and moving images) within the academic, archival, library, gallery, and museum environments.  Educational usage, securing publication rights, creative reuse, rights statements, licensing, and the public domain will be explored within the context of case studies, including those provided by participants in advance of the workshop.  Participants will also be introduced to tools and resources to help them and their constituents in making appropriate decisions regarding appropriate use and dissemination of visual media.

Can We Do That? will be taught by Cara Hirsch, Associate General Counsel at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, which owns and operates the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, as well as the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. Cara supports the Guggenheim’s legal affairs in a wide variety of areas including intellectual property. Prior to the Guggenheim, Cara was Deputy General Counsel for Artstor, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning in the arts, humanities and other fields. Among her duties at Artstor, Cara collaborated in refining Artstor’s intellectual property and other legal strategies for the organization. She also supervised the rights review and clearance process for media collections in the Artstor Digital Library, a digital image resource that makes available to nonprofit institutions over 1.7 million digital images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences. Prior to her work at Artstor, Cara worked as an Associate at the law firms of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP and Andrews Kurth LLP, where she practiced in the field of intellectual property.  She served as Co-Chair of the Intellectual Property Rights Committee of the Visual Resources Association from 2011-2014. Cara received her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law and her B.A., with distinction, from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Registration for Can We Do That? is now open. The fee for this day-long workshop is $125. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/j4slq32. If you have questions about registration, feel free to contact Betha Whitlow, VRAF Director, bwhitlow@wustl.edu. For questions about the Pacific Northwest College of Art venue, please contact Serenity Ibsen, Interim Director of Library Services at PNCA, sibsen@pnca.edu.

For those who also plan to attend Online Northwest on Friday, March 31, this represents a unique opportunity to make a long weekend packed with high-level programming!

Request for Proposals – 2017 Information Literacy Summit

Header image for ILAGO request for proposals

The Information Literacy Advisory Group of Oregon (ILAGO) is accepting proposals for presentations at the 2017 Information Literacy Summit.

The 11th annual ILAGO Information Literacy Summit will be held Saturday, May 13, 2017 at Washington State University’s campus in Vancouver, WA.

The theme for this year’s IL Summit is “Assessment” but we invite a variety of presentations related to information literacy.

Program proposals will be accepted until March 3rd, 2017.

For more information, or to submit a proposal, please see: http://tinyurl.com/zxvmuwz or contact Mark Peterson at mark.peterson@mhcc.edu

 

Engagement Opportunity – Participate in a Research Study

Librarians at Penn State University are conducting a study on the presence and use of prayer spaces in academic libraries – and need your help!

If you are currently employed at or are a student at a college or university in
the United States, please consider responding to their survey before February 28. 2017.

The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete, and will not
collect any identifiable information.

Access the survey through this anonymous link:
https://pennstate.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0BZDw1us678jfUx

Initial survey results will be available at ACRL 2017 in Baltimore, with future wide dissemination planned.  If you have questions or concerns, please contact the investigators:

Emily Mross, ELM43@psu.edu, 717-948-6130

Christina Riehman-Murphy, CER20@psu.edu, 215-881-7911

ILAGO developing a shared metacognitive self-assessment tool

The Information Literacy Advisory Group of Oregon (ILAGO) board would like to share with the ACRL-OR library community about an exciting project they’re initiating in 2017. ILAGO is developing a shared metacognitive self-assessment tool of students’ research strategies that can be used in concert with institution-specific learning assessments. The overall goal is to work with instruction librarians to create and share a validated assessment tool that helps establish the baseline research strategies and conceptual knowledge that best support college level work.
The project will also enable ILAGO to:

  • Sustain a discussion in our community of educators to articulate what we value in students’ Information Literacy skills and practices as they enter college.
  • Engage regional IL stakeholders such as colleagues in the Oregon Association of School Libraries (OASL), Oregon Library Association Library Instruction Round Table (OLA-LIRT), the Oregon Writing Educational Advisory Committee (OWEAC), ACRL Oregon, and College Librarians and Media Specialists (CLAMS, Washington State).

To develop the assessment tool, ILAGO is using a model provided by The Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory (MARSI). This inventory functions as both a teaching tool and an assessment of student’s self-reported reading and thinking strategies.

The MARSI was validated through a qualitative study (cited below) with an iterative design approach. The researchers took a large set of reading strategy statements generated by Reading faculty and, through a few rounds of student testing, pared them down to a manageable set of 30 statements in a one-page list. The strategy statements are also grouped by type so that areas of learning can be identified.

Model study:
Mokhtari, K., & Reichard, C. A. (2002). Assessing students’ metacognitive awareness of reading strategies. Journal of educational psychology, 94(2), 249.

ILAGO will continue to provide updates on the project and solicit future participation as the work evolves. Please contact Sara Robertson (sara.robertson@pcc.edu) or Candice Watkins (cwatkins@tacomacc.edu), project leads for ILAGO, with any questions or input.

Interview with Robin Jeffrey, Klamath Community College

Continuing our interview series of reaching out to academic library leaders across the state to facilitate “getting to know” our colleagues… the next interview in this series is with Robin Jeffrey, Learning Resource Center (LRC) Director at Klamath Community College, located in Klamath Falls.

Thanks for talking with us, Robin!

Photo of Robin Jeffrey

Robin Jeffrey, LRC Director, Klamath Community College

How did you get into librarianship and how did you end up at Klamath Falls?

You could say that librarianship runs in my family! My mother has been a librarian for 18 years and I was always her most excited work volunteer. Even before that we were a very library-centric family, to the point where, as a toddler, I thought it was a fun game to pretend to ‘check-out’ books from my ‘library’ to my older sister. I’ve known for a long time that being a librarian was in the cards for me!

I ended up in Klamath Falls after I graduated from the University of Kentucky with my MLS. I was on the hunt for that elusive first library job when I saw a posting for a library assistant at Klamath Community College. I wanted desperately to be an academic librarian and it seemed like the perfect way to get my foot in the door. That was almost 2 years ago now and I certainly haven’t regretted the amazing opportunities I’ve gotten at KCC!

Who/What has been the greatest influence upon you so far in your career?

Mark Peterson, who’s been featured on this blog before, was and is simply the best mentor any young librarian could hope to have. He gave me a chance to fulfill a lifelong dream and equipped me with all the tools and knowledge I would need to excel! In addition to him, though, I have to give another shout out to my mom, who I call and ask for librarian advice from all the time.

What has been the best thing that has happened to you since you started in your position?

The best thing that has happened to you since I started this position has been being on the receiving end of an outflowing of support from other OR. library directors and librarians. It’s been such a welcoming and heartwarming experience and I’m learning so much from everyone every day.

Tell us about your OER writing book. What prompted you to create the book? How did you go about creating it? (what platform, conceptual organization)? Who is making use of the textbook currently?

Klamath Community College serves a large population of students, many of whom are at or below the poverty line. Having to buy a $200 textbook for a required course may very well mean the difference between a student finishing their degree or giving up – not to mention it has a huge impact on their finances if they do purchase the book (i.e. I don’t get my medication this month because I can’t afford it, or I’m only eating dinner this week)!

The LRC initiated a meeting with the Writing Department to discuss these issues and talk about possible solutions. The Writing Faculty outlined for us what they liked about the book they were using, which was really only the basic grammar, sentence structure, and citation material. I offered to create a writing guide that would cover all these basic concepts and which would be open source. Hence, About Writing was born!

I relied a lot on my background as an English undergrad to create the content for the book, drawing ideas from online sources like Purdue OWL and from the textbook currently in use, A Writer’s Reference. Amy Hofer, the OR State OER Librarian was a great help while creating this resource, especially in gaining feedback from faculty and formatting it to be published on Pressbooks! Currently, About Writing is in use at Portland Community College, Klamath Community College, and Clackamas Community College!

Tell us about your love for graphic novels/comic books. How has this manifested itself so far in your work at KFCC?

I’m a lifelong reader and I’m here to tell you that some of the best work being done in creative fiction right now is being done graphically. Whether its DC, Marvel, Image, or that small indie publisher that cranks out photocopies of new work, graphic novels are, to me, the perfect marriage between image and text. I’ve been a regular comic shop patron since I was 16 and have been going to comicons for over 8 years, with no plans to stop.

I’ve always considered graphic novels to be the “gateway drug” of reading and have found, more often than not, that no matter how much people insist they don’t like to read, almost everyone can be persuaded to pick up a comic! With this in mind, I’ve helped create a (still growing!) graphic novel collection at KCC, which has helped to boost our circulation numbers across the board. Students of all ages get excited when they hear that such a collection exists, which gets them into the library – and once they’re there, they almost always walk out with a few books under their arms.

What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

The biggest challenge facing my library in the upcoming year is our push to become more of a community space. We want everyone to feel welcome in the library, even if they don’t have research to do and just want to hang out! Facilitating that culture shift is an exciting challenge.

What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

The Klamath Community College Learning Resource Center, which I head, is made up of three distinct areas of the college – the library, the Tutoring Center, and the Testing Center. We’re a small academic library with a growing presence on campus and we are instrumental in helping people succeed in their academic pursuits!

What does advocacy for academic libraries look like from your perspective as a library director?

From my perspective as a library director, advocacy for academic libraries looks like constantly throwing a surprise party; as long as I can keep coming up with new services and resources to offer the students, faculty, and staff that keep them saying “Wow!”, I’m showing just how useful, versatile and vital an academic library is on any campus.

Potpourri – what’s something random that’s worth knowing about you?

I am actively pursuing a side career in creative writing! Last year was the first time I was ever paid for my creative work, when I won second place in a contest for my flash fiction piece Season of the Dead.

Call for Authors: Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing

The “Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing” project (IMLS, 2016-2018) invites proposals to create a curriculum to support library-based publishers. This invitation extends to professionals in library publishing (past or present), LPC members/practitioners, LIS/iSchool professors, PhD candidates, and others with an interest and/or experience in this growing area of activity. Each proposal may be authored by an individual or a team.

Each proposal should focus on ONE of the following four course topics: Policy, Content, Impact, or Sustainability. See the Library Publishing Curriculum Framework for more details on what each of these course topics might include.

Each selected author will develop a self-paced online course covering approximately 5-7 subtopics and providing approximately 15 hours of instruction and materials.

Selected proposal authors will:

  • Attend an in-person retreat with the project team and fellow authors to review program goals, discuss formats and learning styles, and refine the learning objectives and methods we will use for each course and its subtopics (April-May, 2017).
  • Assemble the following learning materials for each course subtopic: learning objectives, readings, a narrative core for the course, a brief annotated bibliography, case studies, and exercises (May-August, 2017).
  • Refine the materials according to guidance from an Instructional Designer (August-September, 2017).
  • Create a course guide to support those who may use the materials (October 2017).
  • Assist in the creation of evaluation instruments tied to the learning objectives and competencies covered in your course (November-December, 2017).
  • Be invited to participate as a panelist at the 2018 Library Publishing Forum to talk about the project and the course materials (March-April, 2018).

The curriculum is expected to reach more than 100 students in the first year of pilot experiences (2018) through LIS programs, professional development workshops, and online courses.

An honorarium of $4,000 for each of the four course topics (Policy, Content, Impact, and Sustainability) will be provided to each of the four authors (or author teams) as they complete their work on the four course topics in December 2017, in recognition of the time and energy course development requires. Travel expenses will be covered for each of the four authors (or, in the case of a team, the lead author) to attend the in-person retreat. In addition, each author will have an opportunity to present at the 2018 Library Publishing Forum.

Proposals are due by 5pm PT on February 28, 2017. Authors will be notified by March 31, 2017.

Proposals should consist of:

  • A 1-2 page summary of your proposed approach to designing and developing the self-paced online course on one of the four named topics (Policy, Content, Impact, or Sustainability) and its range of potential subtopics (please see the Framework for more information).
  • A current author CV. For team proposals, a CV should be included for each team member, along with brief contribution statements, and a lead author for correspondence should be identified.
  • A brief (one paragraph) statement of purpose, explaining why you are interested in being an author in this project.

Proposals will be reviewed and authors selected by the Advisory Board, with the following criteria in mind:

  • Successful proposals will demonstrate knowledge of the relevant topics, effective written communication skills, understanding of diverse learning styles, and will cover the topics and objectives laid out in the framework.
  • The field of library publishing includes a broad range of publication types and activities (e.g., journals, monographs, ETDs, and textbooks, in both restricted and open access formats), and proposals that reflect this range will be prioritized.
  • Care will be taken to assemble a group of authors with diverse voices in terms of gender, sexuality, race, and cultural backgrounds.

For more information, visit the Call for Authors Google Doc or contact Melanie Schlosser (melanie@educopia.org)  or any member of the Advisory Board with questions.

 

Feedback Survey for the ESSA State Plan Framework

Our OLA/OASL/ACRL Task Force on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) continues to work to get school libraries into Oregon’s implementation plan.  You can help by responding to the Oregon Department of Education’s survey on the plan.  The Task Force developed suggestions for some of the questions on the survey.  These are available on the OLA website at http://www.olaweb.org/oregon-school-libraries-and-the-every-student-succeeds-act.  The more input from Oregon’s library community, the better.

The survey closes January 16, so please act now. Take the survey here: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=399