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Sign up to attend ACRL-Oregon-sponsored Preconferences at OLA

OLA Conference posterACRL-Oregon is sponsoring two Preconferences at the Oregon Library Association Conference that will be of interest to academic librarians across the state. Please consider signing up for one or both of them!

Portland Community College librarian Pam Kessinger will be leading a panel with faculty from PCC’s Developmental Education program to explore “Metacognition and Reading Strategies to Bridge Students Toward Inquiry.” Librarians who teach will learn how the Reading Apprenticeship framework as well as our own ACRL Framework for Information Literacy can be used to develop meaningful information literacy instruction. This session is co-sponsored with the Library Instruction Round Table. 

In August 2017, ACRL-Oregon awarded Maureen Flanagan Battistella a professional development award to attend the American Association of State and Local History conference. Maureen’s attendance there was part of an ongoing project in partnership with colleagues at Southern Oregon University, Hannon Library, Jackson County Library, and others to  create “unique digital collections that tell the stories of Southern Oregon.”

Interested in learning more about Maureen’s research and how to engage your own community via an oral history project? Sign up to attend the pre-conference session she is leading, “How to Document Oregon’s Thousand Points of Life: Techniques and Technologies to Engage Your Community Using an Oral History Project” with a fantastic panel of university faculty and librarians.

Interested in having your own conference, workshop, or professional development project funded? Apply for an ACRL-Oregon professional development award now! Deadline for next consideration is February 28, 2018.

 

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Reminder: Professional Development Scholarship Deadline Approaching

Thanks to a one-time matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $500 for each award for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the February 28 deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2017-2018 year:

  • February 28
  • April 30
  • November 30 (done)

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Steve Silver
ACRL-OR President, 2017-2018
Northwest Christian University
acrlor@olaweb.org

Interview with Michelle Bagley, Portland Community College

Michelle Bagley is a long-time Portland resident, but is new to Oregon libraries, having worked as the Library Director at Clark College in Vancouver, Washington for many years. She is now seven months into her role as Dean of the Library at Portland Community College.

Photo of Michelle Bagley

Michelle Bagley, Dean of the Library, Portland Community College

Tell us a little bit about your work background. How did you get into librarianship?

I was working in private industry and serving as a liaison to the inaugural First Book Local Advisory Board (Portland, OR) when I began considering a career change. One of the board members urged me to look into a career in librarianship. After some research and reflection I enrolled in the Emporia State SLIM program. I graduated in 2004 and began working in libraries shortly thereafter. Librarianship has been a terrific career path for me. I have been able to use my extensive management and customer service skills developed in my previous career and apply my passion for access to information and education.

What has been the greatest influence upon you so far in your career?

As a graduate student I strongly considered a career in corporate librarianship. This was due in large part to my educational background and work experience. I became a member of the Special Libraries Association (SLA) and the Oregon Special Libraries chapter. As a new librarian, volunteering in a professional association was instrumental in getting established in the profession. I attribute the relatively small membership and extremely diverse range of libraries represented in SLA in equipping me with the skills to advance pretty rapidly. My involvement with SLA gave me the opportunity to chair meetings, plan conferences and professional development events, to work on strategic planning, and to develop professional relationships to SLA leadership. I also joined the SLA Education Division and had the chance to work with some terrific library educators who were staunch advocates for the role of information literacy and libraries.

When I began working as the library director at Clark College (Vancouver, WA) I immediately became involved in consortium and state/system library leadership. Through participation in the Washington Library Leadership Council and the Orbis Cascade Alliance I was able to deepen my experience and work on initiatives with the goal to enhance library services and promote effective state/regional partnerships. Also I worked with leaders from across Clark College. Serving as a member of Instructional Council and other key college groups provided me with the opportunity to learn and contribute to the college’s work focused on student learning and success. As I progressed in my role at Clark we were able to bring other key academic supports into the same unit as the library.  In this transition I was able to take the lead on integrating tutoring, eLearning, student technology support, and faculty support into library services. This was a model we had put into practice at my first library job. This change in my responsibilities had a big impact on continuing to build my capacity as a college leader. I became much more involved in instructional planning and decision making.

What is an achievement in your career of which you’re particularly proud?

The achievement that I am most proud of, at this point in my career, was the work that I lead renovating sections of Clark College’s Cannell Library and developing a new student service area, Tech Hub. The development of Tech Hub originated during the revision of Clark’s comprehensive IT plan. A key outcome for the plan was to develop centralized student technology help. The partnership between IT, eLearning, and the library demonstrated the best of collaboration.

Shortly after the development of Tech Hub, the library presented a proposal to the Student Technology Fee Committee to fund a some necessary improvements to the library. The first part of the proposal was an update to the lower level of the library to accommodate a collaborative commons, including improvements to the electrical/data infrastructure in the library. The renovated space is beautiful and has become a destination for students looking for collaborative learning spaces. The second part of the project was a modification the second floor computer lab which presented some hazards for building evacuation and was consistently mentioned in the student satisfaction survey as being too crowded, too hot, and too loud. By moving roughly half of the computers from this lab to the new collaborative commons, the space became an inviting “quiet” computer lab.

I am proud of these projects because they demonstrate the things that I am most passionate about – listening to/observing library user needs, developing services based on these needs, and having a positive impact on learners.

What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

PCC Library is a very innovative library with a focus on instruction, student success, collaboration, assessment, and student-centered services. The library staff and faculty are very active contributors to work related to teaching and learning, assessment, and librarianship. They are strong partners in collaborative efforts at the college, in the Pacific Northwest, and nationally. These partnerships range from work with PCC faculty on integrating information literacy and library resources into to their courses, to advocating and promoting the use of Open Educational Resources, to developing new programs and services that provide access to library collections and technology across our service district.

What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

A big challenge that PCC Library is facing in the coming year is continued pressure on our budgets (which is likely a common theme at many academic libraries).

Also PCC has recently joined Achieving the Dream. This year is a planning year; the challenge is to find a balance between letting the foundational work occur and having the college include information literacy and the library into the re-imagined student experience.

What does advocacy for academic libraries look like from your perspective as a library director?

While the library director plays a key role in this work I have found advocacy is most effective when all library staff can speak a common message to the college community (and beyond). This is particularly important because academic libraries are multi-faceted – definitely academic in nature, strongly linked to student services, part of the college’s physical infrastructure, and a place for community engagement. We all can keep the library on the radar of college leaders and decision makers, develop and maintain solid collaborative relationships with faculty, student services and other college staff, and promote student-focused services and spaces.

This means that everyone working in an academic library benefits from being involved in library planning. Ideally each person has the capacity to highlight the library as an important campus learning space, communicate the importance of information literacy in our students’ learning, speak to the cultural importance of libraries for campuses, respond to the growing need to support our faculty and staff in their work. When library faculty and staff are actively involved in planning and operations in all areas and all levels of the college, the library benefits.

As the library director I have the responsibility to advocate for and demonstrate the impact that integrating academic libraries into the college’s instructional programs and student supports has on our students and our community. I am also responsible for creating an environment that prepares all library staff to be engaged in the conversations and activities.

Anything else you’d like Oregon academic librarians to know about you?

I am very excited to now live and work in Oregon. I am eager to get more involved in working with academic libraries, to learn more about specific initiatives that are important to Oregon libraries, to promote our value to students, faculty, and staff as well as to state leaders. I think it is crucial that we continue to advocate for libraries to ensure that libraries are involved in key educational initiatives, are funded to accomplish our objectives, and are recognized for the impact that we have locally, regionally, and nationally.

Incorporating Mindfulness Into My Teaching

Hi! I’m Meredith Farkas, ACRL-Oregon’s VP/President-Elect and a librarian at Portland Community College. Like many of my colleagues on the ACRL-OR Board, I attended the ACRL-PNW Conference at Pack Forest in October. For me, the highlight of the conference was a session entitled “Contemplative Pedagogy: An Ancient Solution for a Modern Problem” presented by Nicole Gustavsen of UW-Bothell/Cascadia College and Heather Newcomer of Olympic College. The session described mindfulness practice and how it can benefit us — both professionally and personally — and our students in our continuous-partial-attention-driven, technology-filled world. Nicole and Heather had attendees participate in a breath and body guided mindfulness exercise and then described how they used mindfulness exercises at the start of some of their classes and the benefits of doing so. You can view their slides as well as their list of resources which include the breath and body scan script they used with conference attendees.

Title Slide from Contemplative Pedagogy Presentation

I was inspired by the idea of using brief (2-5 minute) mindfulness exercises at the start of class to better connect with students and help them focus on what we’re doing. I recognize the challenges we have as librarians in building rapport within the context of a one-shot instruction session and this activity seemed like a small change I could make that might help students see that I recognize research can be challenging and am here to support them. That week, I had a Reading 115 class coming in and I thought this would be the perfect group to try this with because a lot of students I’ve worked with in Reading 115 classes in the past have had issues with self-confidence around their academic abilities. I hoped that this might bring their stress level down or at least help them let go temporarily of some of the other things on their minds.

I made a few minor changes to the breath and body scan script Heather and Nicole used so it would fit my own presentation style and then tried it with the class. When I first came into the classroom, students were chatting, texting, sending emails, and all the usual things we see students doing before class. I started by introducing myself and talking a bit about how research can be stressful, how I’m here to support them in that, and that we’re going to do a quick breathing exercise to help us focus on the task at hand. As I read the script, every student participated and the room was silent. Once I’d finished, I found that the class was focused in a way I’d never seen before in my teaching. I don’t know whether or not it brought students’ stress levels down, but it definitely facilitated a solid transition between what they were doing before and what we were all working on together. I also found that when I gave students time in the second half of class to work on their own research, more students in the class asked me for help than usually do. Whether that was a fluke or they really felt more comfortable seeking help from me after the exercise I don’t know for sure, but I feel like it was well worth sacrificing a few minutes of class time to do.

Space Slide from Mindfulness Presentation

Winter term has recently started at Portland Community College, and I’m excited to start more of my classes this term with a breath and body scan. It’s always exciting to go to a conference and be able to apply something from it to your own work, and I want to thank Heather, Nicole, and the ACRL-WA Board for providing us with the opportunity to learn all this!

 

Professional Development Scholarship: Now Accepting Applications

ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a new round of Professional Development Scholarship awards. Thanks to a one-time matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $500 for each award for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the February 28 deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright


Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2017-2018 year:

  • February 28
  • April 30
  • November 30 (done)

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Steve Silver
ACRL-OR President, 2017-2018
Northwest Christian University
acrlor@olaweb.org

What’s New at FWJ Sylwester Library at Concordia University

Kim Olson-Charles, distance education and outreach librarian at Concordia University and current ACRL-Oregon board member, shared the news from the FWJ Sylwester Library.

Concordia University Library Postcard

Personnel changes:
Judy Anderson, the Dean of Libraries, retired this summer after many years at Concordia. Kim Read is now the Interim Dean of Libraries. Additionally, the library welcomes a new Electronic Resources Librarian, Carin Yavorcik, to its staff in mid-January; Carin comes to Concordia from the State of Oregon Law Library.

Concordia OER initiative:
The library is in its second year of leading a campus-wide OER initiative. Fifteen faculty attended this year’s Introduction to OER Workshop and ten faculty will receive a stipend to peer review an open textbook. Stipends to convert courses from commercial textbooks to OER will also be offered again this year, adding to the six courses converted last year.

Personal Librarian Program:
This past fall, Concordia initiated a pilot Personal Librarian Program. As a part of a larger university mandate to address student recruitment and retention, the library contributed by creating the Personal Librarian Program.  Faculty librarians reached out to incoming first-year students throughout fall semester to connect them to a familiar and friendly face that could help them navigate the library and its resources.

Dedication of Wai Tak Cheung Collection at OCOM

The library at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM) recently held a dedication ceremony for the Wai Tak Cheung Collection. The collection consists of over 1,500 Chinese-language books on the topic of Traditional Chinese Medicine, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, Chinese biomedical texts, health and nutrition, and a range of other topics; another 300 or so books still need to be processed for the collection. Candise Branum, the library’s director, believes that this could possibly be the largest collection of this type in the United States.

Photograph of Wai Tak Cheung Collection

Historically, Dr. Cheung was known as “The Father of Acupuncture in Oregon,” helping to bring about legislative changes to legalize and promote the profession in the state.  He was also involved in creating OCOM’s original curriculum and when he passed, he donated his personal library to OCOM. The Wai Tak Cheung collection is searchable via the library’s Primo catalog and on WorldCat, and the library also lends the materials via WorldShare.

Free professional development for health and medical information

With the start of a new year, many people make health-related resolutions. I’d like to propose one such resolution for the new year: be (and help our students be) more health literate.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine logoA few months ago, I started a new position at the University of Western States, which specializes in programs in integrative health care. I quickly became aware of trainings available from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). A hat tip goes to Laura Zeigen at OHSU for suggesting that this would be good information for a blog post!

I participated in a six-part webinar series on PubMed for Librarians, an invaluable (and free!) training series. Each online session was an hour long, so it was convenient to fit it into my schedule. It was an excellent professional development opportunity that paid off immediately in my day-to-day work.

In general, the trainings cover a wide variety of topics and from the perspective of working with different patron populations. My only regret was not knowing about these trainings sooner; they would have been valuable in working with health professions students at area community colleges.

The NNLM also provides targeted resources for evaluating health websites and conducting the consumer health reference interview, including ethical concerns.

Know the Science logo

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health logoAnother great health resource is the Know the Science series from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). It has interactive modules, videos, and tutorials that help users understand complex scientific topics related to health research and become more health literate. There are a number of resources about understanding complementary health care, dietary supplements, and unpacking the concept of natural medicines. In a state like Oregon, where so many people use complementary and integrative health care, the resources from NCCIH are highly relevant and useful.

Stephanie Debner
University of Western States

ACRL-OR report from 2017 Joint Conference

ACRL-OR was well represented at the ACRL Joint Conference for Washington and Oregon at Pack Forest in mid-October. The conference theme “Tried and True or Shiny and New” gave the attendees from both Oregon and Washington an opportunity to explore such topics as just in time assessment and how OER is being integrated and implemented at Tacoma Community College.

A huge hit was the short talks of epic fails!  Presenters shared their library moments, programs and classes that were duds or even huge mistakes. Each of the “failed” librarians learned something from their experience and bravely and nobly, shared their lessons learned with the conference attendees.

ACRL-OR was able to meet in the evening to discuss the upcoming scholarships for professional development with enhanced funding from LSTA monies and kick around ideas for next Fall’s joint OR/WA ACRL conference at Menucha where the Oregon group will host and provide programming. Lots of great ideas were brought up by the attending group. Two themes, “Collaborating for Greater Impact” and “Reimagining Advocacy” were seriously discussed but neither was chosen as a final theme at the time.

Since the conference, the ACRL Board has decided on the theme of “Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, Political.” If you have any ideas for conference speakers, the board would love to hear them! Contact Steve Silver at acrlor@olaweb.org.

Conference on Open Practices

A group of OR and WA librarians is exploring the idea of a conference on open practices for librarianship, to take place on March 16. Will you please complete a short survey by 12/22 to help us plan?

The idea: a conference in the Pacific Northwest for librarians to share concrete, hands-on ideas about how to incorporate open practices into all aspects of library work. We will look beyond persuading faculty to adopt OER (though this is important) and investigate a culture change around internal library functions that can be more open. Your input will help us plan the best possible conference.

Please share this message with your colleagues.

Thank you in advance,

Amy Hofer, Cheryl Middleton, Heather Cyre, Candice Watkins, and Jackie Ray