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Apply Today for the School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarships

ACRL-OR seeks to foster collaboration between academic librarians and school librarians. The role of school librarians is vitally important and is in many ways interrelated with the work of academic librarians and the students we all serve. Up to $1,000 is available per year for this scholarship. Applications will be reviewed at two points during the year–or until the money runs out.

How can the scholarship be used?

This funding opportunity covers any collaboration between at least one school librarian and at least one academic librarian that the applicant(s) can make a good case for. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Sponsorship to attend, exhibit, or present at a relevant conference (OASL, regional conferences, or others)
  • Creation of programming, such as a conference, workshop, unconference, or pre-conference
  • Work on a collaborative research project
  • Something else we haven’t thought of!

For examples of past awards, see the following posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

Note: Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All Oregon academic and school librarians
  • Preference will be given to teams that include at least one ACRL-Oregon member in good standing
  • Preference will also be given to applicants who have not previously received a School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon

Who is not eligible?

Academic and school librarians outside of Oregon (unless part of a team of collaborators that includes at least one Oregon librarian).

How will applications be evaluated?

Reviewers will look for applications that:

  • Have at least one applicant who is a member of ACRL-Oregon
  • Demonstrate meaningful collaboration between school and academic librarians
  • Have the potential to favorably influence information literacy awareness/education in Oregon

Deadlines:

  • First round due November 16, 5:00pm
  • Second round deadline TBA if there is still scholarship funding to be awarded

How to apply:

Follow the scholarship application link to access the application.

Last Chance to Register: ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference at Menucha

This is a friendly reminder that registration for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Fall Conference at Menucha is currently open and closes this Monday, October 1st!

Photo of ACRL OR 2018 Conference Mugs

2018 Conference Mugs

The theme of this year’s conference is Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, and Political.  The conference will focus on the full spectrum of advocacy work and how each of us can be better advocates when we work to influence decisions at any level. Attendees will leave the Conference with an elevator pitch and concrete plan to advocate for an issue important to them.

In addition, you’ll hear from keynote speakers:

  • Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and current ALA President
  • Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and 2016-17 ACRL President

and lightening talk presenters discussing issues including:

  • OERs
  • collection development as a form of advocacy
  • advocating for libraries through pedagogy
  • working with student affairs

For more information about the conference or to get registered, visit our conference website: http://bit.ly/acrlpnw18

See you at Menucha!

Register now for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference at Menucha

This is a friendly reminder that registration for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Fall Conference at Menucha is currently open and closes on October 1st.

Scholarships are available for those who live or work in Oregon! Information and application process can be found here. Application deadline for scholarships is September 13. Apply today!

The theme of this year’s conference is Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, and Political. Advocacy means so much more than just lobbying the government or our elected representatives. The Pacific Northwest is full of stories of librarians who have advocated for themselves, their patrons, their libraries, their profession, and their professional values. Our conference will focus on the full spectrum of advocacy work and how each of us can be better advocates when we work to influence decisions at any level. Attendees will leave the Conference with a concrete plan to advocate for an issue important to them.

Our keynote speakers are Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and current ALA President, and Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and 2016-17 ACRL President.

For more information about the conference or to get registered, visit our conference website: http://bit.ly/acrlpnw18

See you at Menucha!

Loida Garcia-Febo and Irene M.H. Herold at the 2018 ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference!

ACRL OR is excited to announce the keynote speakers for the 2018 Joint Fall Conference at Menucha.

Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and ALA President-Elect, will offer the opening keynote, and Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and ACRL Past President, will provide the closing keynote address. Garcia-Febo and Herold will share their experience and speak to the conference theme of “Reimagining Advocacy: Persona, Professional, Political.”  Read more about these speakers – and register! – at https://acrloregon.org/conferences/2018-acrl-or-wa-joint-conference/

 

Engagement of Academic Librarians in State Organizations Survey

William and Mary Libraries invite you to participate in a survey that seeks to examine the engagement of academic librarians in their statewide or regional library organization. The survey seeks your perspective on a range of topics, including your current level and method of engagement in professional service at the state level and how you perceive your state academic library association. Your responses will help to shape the future directions and decision-making of state-level library associations. Thank you for your time.

CONTINUE TO SURVEY

This study seeks to examine the engagement of librarians in their statewide or regional academic  library organization. The survey seeks your perspective on a range of topics, including your current level and method of engagement in professional service at the state level and how you perceive your state academic library association. Your responses will help to shape the future directions and decision-making of state-level library associations.

This is an online survey. After reading this informed consent text, please proceed directly to the online questionnaire. If you click the “Continue to Survey” link you will be taken to an external page to complete the survey and will be understood to represent your consent to participate in the survey.

The survey will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete and your responses will be stored in a database and may be included in a forthcoming publication, but will not be linked to any unique identifier.

Completion of the survey carries no known or foreseeable risks.

You will not directly benefit from completion of this survey, although the study findings may contribute to improvements in services or resources provided by professional library organizations and in the body of library research literature.

You have the alternative not to participate in this study.

There are no costs associated with completion of this survey. You will not be paid for completing the survey.

Your participation in this study will generate no personally identifiable record, data, or document. It is possible that online hackers, spyware filters or other Web impediments to secure online communication might be able to eavesdrop on your submission. It is difficult to assess the risks or consequences of this, but they are based in part on the security of your network connections and, in any case, are believed to be small.

Your participation in this survey is voluntary; you have the right to withdraw at any point.

You may print a copy of this consent page. The principle investigators, Lisa Nickel (ltnickel@wm.edu), Dorinne Banks (dbanks@gwu.edu), Lucinda Rush (lrush@odu.edu), and Paige Flanagan (pflanagan@hsc.edu)  will answer any questions you may have about the study.

If you have questions about your rights as a research participant you should contact William & Mary’s PHSC chair  Dr. Jennifer Stevens, 757-221-3862, jastev@wm.edu
 

Apply now: Scholarship applications open for ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

ACRL-OR has funds to award up to nine (9) scholarships to attend the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference. This year, the Oregon chapter is hosting the conference on October 25 & 26 at the Menucha Retreat & Conference Center. Apply now!

How can the scholarships be used?  

The scholarship covers the registration fee of $140 for the conference, which includes room (dorm option) and meals.  

Who is eligible?

This scholarship is designed for those who live and/or work in Oregon. For those who live and/or work in Washington, please refer to the ACRL-WA site for conference scholarship information. Those meeting at least one of the criteria below are eligible to apply.  Each criteria met will be awarded points in the evaluation process (see below under how the application will be evaluated).  

  1. First-time attendee of the joint conference.  
  2. ACRL-OR member.
  3. MLIS student in an ALA-accredited program who lives in Oregon.
  4. Paraprofessional employee in an Oregon academic library.
  5. Part-time or temporary employee in an Oregon academic library.

Who is not eligible?

  • Those who do not live and/or work in Oregon.
  • Those who meet none of the criteria described above.
  • Those who have received a Fall Conference Scholarship in the past.

How will applications be evaluated?

A point system will be used to rank applicant eligibility (First time attendee: 2 points; ACRL-OR member: 2 points; MLIS student: 1 point; Paraprofessional: 1 point; part-time or temporary employee: 1 point).  In addition, application essays will be evaluated for:

  1. Financial need.
  2. Interest in the conference theme/program.
  3. Plans to apply knowledge gained at the conference.   

Deadline:

The application period for the 2018 Fall Conference Scholarships will be Monday, August 13 to Thursday, September 13.  Apply now!

Applicants will be notified shortly after the application period closes. Registration for the ACRL Oregon & Washington Joint Fall Conference is open until Wednesday, October 1.

For more information, please contact:

Stephanie Debner, ACRL-OR Board Past President
sdebner@uws.edu
University of Western States

Last call for nominations for the ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence!

Last call for nominations for the ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence!

What does the award acknowledge?

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence shall be given to recognize a project that demonstrates excellence in the field by significantly improving Oregon academic libraries or librarianship. Here are some reflections on the impact of receiving this award from past project winners:

Who is eligible?

  • Any individual or group in Oregon may apply or be nominated. Individuals or groups that include at least one employee of an academic library may be given priority consideration.
  • Initiative or project that is the basis of the nomination must have occurred in the previous three years.
  • This is not a lifetime achievement award.
  • ACRL-Oregon membership is NOT required.
  • Nominee or nominated group may include a member of the ACRL-Oregon Board; however they must recuse themselves from the voting process.

What does the award cover?

  • An engraved plaque
  • Recognition at the ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference
  • One paid registration for the recipient to attend the ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

More information and past winners can be found on the ACRL-Oregon website: https://acrloregon.org/acrl-oregon-award-for-excellence/

Extended deadline! The nomination period will close at 11:59pm on September 7, 2018.

Submit a nomination now.

For questions, please contact:

Steve Silver
ACRL-Oregon President
acrlor@olaweb.org

A Critical Summer Service for Students and Community Patrons

This weekend I faced a difficult decision; one which I will likely face repeatedly for the next couple months: should I go to work? The question wasn’t really about my work obligation – I typically work during the day, Monday thru Friday. The underlying issue causing me to question a trip to work on my days off has been this heat, and how inescapable it feels. I live in the central Willamette Valley in a medium-sized apartment and, like many others with similar living arrangements throughout the state, my unit has no air conditioning. For the first day of the weekend I was able to escape the brunt of the heat, winding around breezy Newport for most of the day.

But today was Sunday, and I had writing responsibilities to take care of. All the windows were closed by 9 am and the electrical fans were on full power – it was all futile. By noon, my energy was sapped and the thought of a warm laptop anywhere near me was a sickening idea. It was already ninety degrees outside and predicted to reach a high of one-hundred. The future forecast looked just a dreary and there would be no respite any time soon. Needless to say, I lost a lot of willpower that day. I still completed my tasks, but I wasn’t able to focus in earnest until late into the evening. When I finally went to bed well past midnight, I was dismayed at how hot it still was.

As I trudged through the front doors of the library this morning, I was awash in a relieving sensation. The building’s air conditioning was already churning out cold air and it acted as a salve for my lingering temperament. Even as I sit at my desk now, the low hum of air from the ceiling vents is comforting. I know of at least one coworker who purposely works in their office space long into the night hours during the summer as a means of refuge from their own hot, non-A/C apartment, and I’m beginning to consider the same.

In all walks of librarianship, we think about the library as “place”, but in an increasingly turbulent world, libraries are increasingly seen as a place of refuge for patrons. When it comes to extreme heat or cold, our public libraries take center stage, and rightfully so. In the past couple month, there have been news articles from across the country (1, 2, 3) directing people to specific locations, many of them public libraries, as a designated places to stay cool. When an HVAC unit goes out, it becomes imperative to fix the problem so that patrons can once again utilize library services and space (4, 5).

For those of us in academia, library buildings are also a place for refuge, not just for our students, but for our communities as well. When I come to work in the morning, staff aren’t the only individuals there – typically a dozen or so students are already in the library printing off materials before their morning classes or settling in for study time. Many of those students live near campus in units without air conditioning, or even in on-campus dorms, which certainly do not have AC. Every day I see members of our community in the library as well, using computer resources, reading, or meeting. A few of our regulars will even comment on how hot it is outside, and remain in our building for as long as possible.

For all the benefits our patrons derive from academic libraries, I’ve always, incorrectly, associated the idea of refuge with public libraries – even though I was personally involved in a discussion on keeping our own library open longer hours during a heatwave last year. Upon critical reflection, refuge from the weather isn’t something we’ve advertised in the past, and I’d like to change that. This is also a call out to the academic community –Today, I plan on getting in contact with the housing division in order to distribute leaflets advertising our hours and location for refuge from the heat for all students living on campus this term. Some flyers and sandwich boards around campus should help as well.

Finally, I’d like to pose a question to our readership:

Have you ever explicitly advertised your library in a physical way (i.e. poster, leaflet, or image-based announcement) to draw in patrons to take advantage of free air conditioning (or heating)?

If so, please submit them to Christopher Mansayon with the subject line: ‘summer refuge’, and we’ll highlight/share the submissions on the ACRL-OR blog at a later date.

What I Did This Summer: Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians

This post was written by Stephanie Debner, one of the recipients of an ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship this year. In this post, she reflects on the professional development opportunity that was supported with this award.

Thanks to receiving a professional development scholarship from ACRL-Oregon, well as funding from the Pacific Northwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, I was able to attend Supporting Clinical Care: An Institute in Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Health Sciences Library in Aurora, CO this July. This institute is an intensive three-day learning experience that focuses on the skills that health sciences/medical librarians need to support evidence-based practice. It combines large-group lectures and activities with lots of small group sessions that focus on hands-on learning and discussion.

This institute was an invaluable learning opportunity for me. I teach a class that focuses on the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) and literature research skills in the College of Chiropractic at University of Western States. This class is the first in a series of EBP classes that the chiropractic students take, and is foundational to their understanding of EBP principles and starting to think clinically. While I had familiarized myself with the concepts that I have been teaching, this institute really allowed me to take a deep dive into the concepts and putting them into practice. My first action item for bringing this learning back to my institution is to retool this class for the next time I teach it in winter term 2019. I also expect this learning to inform changes that I make to one-shot sessions in other EBP classes.

One key focus of the institute was on critical appraisal of research evidence, with a focus on randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews. I realized that this content would be particularly valuable to bring back to the UWS library, as we work with chiropractic students who have critically appraised topic assignments in the beginning of their clinical training. I plan to develop a resource to share with my colleagues that will help us to work with students on this assignment more effectively.

Not only did I have the opportunity to learn from the institute’s tutors, many of whom have years of experience with this institute and in teaching EBP, but I also had the opportunity to learn from my fellow attendees, many of whom are experience medical or health sciences librarians. Through small group sessions and talking with colleagues who participate in systematic review teams at their institutions, I picked up tips and skills for doing better literature searches to support faculty research interests at my own institution.

An additional benefit from the institute pertains to my own teaching. Since one of the purposes of the institute is training librarians to feel comfortable in teaching EBP at their institutions, there was also a focus on modeling different teaching methods and activities to teach this content. I noted several different ideas to bring back to the classroom, particularly ways that would facilitate class participation and on-the-fly assessment of student learning. One of these ideas was lower-tech: giving each student three different emoji on half-sheets of paper that they could hold up to indicate opinions on specific questions, and that the instruction could use to facilitate conversations about those opinions. Another idea was a little more high-tech: the use of Plickers to get real-time data from students, without the need for clickers or having the students go to a specific website. Good stuff!

Many thanks to ACRL-Oregon for supporting this opportunity and to the State Library of Oregon for the matching professional development funds that doubled the funds available to me from ACRL-Oregon.

 

“A great opportunity to promote impactful work ”: Past ACRL-OR Awards for Excellence revisited!

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence recognizes a project that demonstrates excellence in the field by significantly improving Oregon academic libraries or librarianship. Help us recognize the great work of our colleagues — your nominations matter!

This year’s nominations are open! We’re checking in with past recipients to get project updates and hear what the award meant for them. The 2009 award went to the Library Faculty Association Open Access Policy at Oregon State University Libraries. We asked one of the project reps, Michael Boock, to reflect on the award and to give us an update on the status of the project.

What did receiving this award mean to you or your team?

Receiving the ACRL-OR Award for Excellence in 2009 for passing an open access policy came as a huge surprise. We were thrilled that academic librarians in Oregon not only had heard about the passage of our Library Faculty Association Open Access Policy, but that they found the project to be worthy of such an auspicious award. I can safely say, on behalf of the many, many people at OSU Libraries and Press involved in passing and implementing this policy and the college-level and institution-level policies that followed, that the award signaled its importance, not only to fellow faculty and staff within our library, but to the wider community of academic librarians across the state.

How has this project evolved or changed since receiving the award?

Constantly and extensively. The Library Faculty Association open access policy served as a model for policies passed by the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences (now the College of Earth, Oceanic, and Atmospheric Sciences) and the College of Forestry over the next two years. In June 2013, OSU became the second land grant university in the country to pass a Harvard-style institution-wide open access policy. The library served in a lead role in the passage of these policies and has been responsible for their implementation. As of March 1, 2018, there are over 8,000 Oregon State University faculty articles available open access in the ScholarsArchive@OSU institutional repository. We hope that universities, libraries, students, and citizens across the state have benefited from having immediate access to this research.

What’s happening in or around our profession that you’re really excited about?

Related to this award specifically, I’m thrilled with the increase in the number of university open access policies that have been passed over the last several years across the country and the world. I’m also pleased with the increase in the number of open access journals in the LIS field, including the open access Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication whose editorial board includes several Oregon librarians.

Why should someone nominate a project for the ACRL-OR Award for Excellence?

As academic librarians, much of our work often happens behind the scenes. This award provides a great opportunity to identify and promote some of the impactful but not always well-recognized, work of our colleagues on behalf of our patrons.    
More information on the nomination process and past winners can be found on the ACRL-Oregon website. The nomination period closes at 11:59pm on August 31, 2018.