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Apply Now: K-12/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship

Applications are currently open for ACRL-OR’s K-12/Academic librarian collaboration scholarship. Up to $1000 is available to support a joint project involving an academic and a school librarian. The application deadline is Oct. 18, 2019.

Who is eligible?

  • All Oregon academic and school librarians
  • Preference will be given to teams that include at least one ACRL-Oregon member in good standing
  • Preference will also be given to applicants who have not previously received a School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon

Who is not eligible?

Academic and school librarians outside of Oregon (unless part of a team of collaborators that includes at least one Oregon librarian).

How can the scholarship be used?

This funding opportunity covers any collaboration between at least one school librarian and at least one academic librarian that the applicant(s) can make a good case for. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Sponsorship to attend, exhibit, or present at a relevant conference (OASL, regional conferences, or others)
  • Creation of programming, such as a conference, workshop, unconference, or pre-conference
  • Work on a collaborative research project
  • Something else we haven’t thought of

Find examples of past projects from 2019 and 2018 on the ACRL-Oregon blog.

How will applications be evaluated?

Reviewers will look for applications that:

  • Have at least one applicant who is a member of ACRL-Oregon.
  • Demonstrate meaningful collaboration between school and academic librarians.
  • Have the potential to favorably influence information literacy awareness/education in Oregon.

Deadlines:

  • First round due October 18, 2019, 5:00pm.
  • Second round deadline TBA if there is still scholarship funding to be awarded.

Apply today! Follow the scholarship application link to access the application.

Contact Meredith Farkas, ACRL-OR Scholarship Committee Chair, with any questions (contact info below).

Meredith Farkas
ACRL-Oregon President, 2018-2019
Portland Community College
meredith.farkas@pcc.edu

Join ACRL-Oregon for a free webinar about data visualization on 9/13 at 10am!

ACRL-Oregon offers free webinars on topics relevant to academic library staff. Our upcoming webinar is “Data Visualization: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How” and will be presented by Negeen Aghassibake, Data Visualization Librarian at the UW Health Sciences Library on Friday September 13th, from 10-11am Pacific.

Data Visualization: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How

This webinar is designed to be an overview of the fundamentals of data visualization. If you’re new to data visualization or are just curious about what it is and why it’s important, then please join us!

Registration is open to any library staff-person, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon!

https://forms.gle/DbjWtHB9eAAwXSsu7

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available on our YouTube channel. If you register, we will email you a link to the recording after the session.

Heidi Senior awarded ACRL-OR Professional Development scholarship

ACRL-OR is delighted to announce the awarding of a professional development scholarship to Heidi Senior, reference and instruction librarian at the University of Portland (UP). Ms. Senior will be co-presenting a poster at the Access Services Conference November 21 and 22 in Atlanta, Georgia, and will use these scholarship funds to support her travel and attendance at the conference. The poster will present information on UP’s Clark Library’s recent professional development activities related to ethical practices. Jane Scott, UP’s Head of Public Services will be co-presenting the poster.

Photograph of Heidi Senior

Heidi Senior, Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Portland

Congratulations to Ms. Senior on receiving this scholarship. We wish her and Ms. Scott safe travels and look forward to hearing about her experiences following the conference in November.

2018-19 Annual Report to the Membership by Meredith Farkas, ACRL-Oregon President

As I prepare to step down at the end of my year as President of ACRL-Oregon, I wanted to share with you some of the terrific work our Board has done this past academic year. 

In October 2018, we held another successful ACRL-OR/WA Conference at Menucha. The theme was focused on “Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, Political” and one of the highlights of the conference was OLA lobbyist Amanda Dalton’s presentation on how to develop a convincing elevator pitch. We hope to see many of you at this year’s ACRL-OR/WA Conference at Pack Forest which is focused on another very important topic: “Whiteness and Racism in Academic Libraries: Dismantling Structures of Oppression.” We are currently seeking ideas for the 2020 conference theme — please fill out our survey!

When I decided to run for ACRL-Oregon President-Elect, I really wanted to explore the possibility of offering webinars. Plenty of people working in academic libraries have little or no access to professional development funding and I wanted our organization to offer professional development that is accessible to every academic library worker in the state regardless of membership status. I also know that we have a lot of talent and wisdom across the state and I’m hoping this will give people opportunities to present that they may not have otherwise had (if you’re interested, please fill out our proposal form!). We offered three pilot webinars in the Winter and Spring of 2019 and will start our official webinar schedule on September 13th at 10am with a presentation entitled “Data Visualization: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How.” Please register if you’re interested; it’s free to members and non-members alike. Getting this program off the ground was definitely a passion project for me and my partners-in-crime on the project (Aja Bettencourt-McCarthy from OIT, Katherine Donaldson from UO, Sarah Rowland from EOU, and Candise Branum from OCOM) and I hope you find it valuable.

ACRL-Oregon offers a number of scholarships every year, including professional development scholarships, scholarships to the ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference, and funding to support a collaborative project between K-12 and academic library workers. The latter was awarded this year to librarians at Eastern Oregon University and library and instructional staff at the North Powder School District to support the development of information literacy instructional strategies for students at the high school. A full report of their activities can be found on our blog. 

One area that is nearly impossible to plan for is advocacy, and this was a big year for the Board in terms of advocacy work. After we heard reports about the racist incidents at ALA Midwinter, we felt compelled to write a statement of concern to ACRL encouraging them to address the issues and suggesting anti-bias and bystander training for staff and volunteer leaders. When we learned that the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) had a draft revision of their standards that significantly pared down the library section and removed any language about academic freedom, we took action. In our letter to NWCCU, we advocated for the importance and value of academic libraries and library personnel to student learning as well as the importance of a robust support of academic freedom. We also worked with various state and regional membership organizations, colleges, and universities to coordinate advocacy efforts. They have since added in additional verbiage about the critical human resources in our libraries and added back in the section on academic freedom. The ACRL-OR Board provided written testimony in favor of Oregon HB 3263 which supported school librarians in Oregon. We also encouraged our members to advocate in support of two bills regarding Open Educational Resources (one of which was successful). Finally, our fantastic ACRL-OR Legislative Representative, Kim Olson-Charles from Concordia University served as Oregon’s representative at National Library Legislative Day this year.

Another big project we took on this year was documenting all of the different roles people play on the ACRL-Oregon Board, so if you decide to serve on the Board in the future, you’ll have a clear sense of what each volunteer position entails along with useful tips from people who have had the role in the past. 

It has been an honor and a pleasure leading ACRL-Oregon’s work this year. I can’t recommend highly enough service on the ACRL-Oregon Board; it’s a perfect opportunity to get to know other fantastic and committed library workers in Oregon and to help support librarianship across the state. It has definitely been one of the most fulfilling service opportunities I’ve taken on. I look forward to supporting Candise Branum, your incoming-President, this year in my role as Past-President. If you have any questions about the Board’s activities or what it’s like to serve on the ACRL-Oregon Board, please get in touch (meredith.farkas@pcc.edu)!

Apply now: Scholarship applications open for ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

ACRL-OR has funds to award two scholarships to attend the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference. This year, the Washington chapter is hosting the conference on October 24 & 25 at the Pack Forest Conference Center in Washington. Apply now!

How can the scholarships be used?

The scholarship covers the registration fee of $155 for the conference, which includes room (dorm option) and meals.

Who is eligible?

This scholarship is designed for those who live and/or work in Oregon. For those who live and/or work in Washington, please refer to the ACRL-WA site for conference scholarship information. Those meeting at least one of the criteria below are eligible to apply.  Each criteria met will be awarded points in the evaluation process (see below under how the application will be evaluated).

  1. First-time attendee of the joint conference.
  2. ACRL-OR member.
  3. MLIS student in an ALA-accredited program who lives in Oregon.
  4. Paraprofessional employee in an Oregon academic library.
  5. Part-time or temporary employee in an Oregon academic library.

Who is not eligible?

  • Those who do not live and/or work in Oregon.
  • Those who meet none of the criteria described above.
  • Those who have received a Fall Conference Scholarship in the past.

How will applications be evaluated?

A point system will be used to rank applicant eligibility (First time attendee: 2 points; ACRL-OR member: 2 points; MLIS student: 1 point; Paraprofessional: 1 point; part-time or temporary employee: 1 point).  In addition, application essays will be evaluated for:

  1. Financial need.
  2. Interest in the conference theme/program.
  3. Plans to apply knowledge gained at the conference.

Deadline:

The deadline for the 2019 Fall Conference Scholarship applications will be Friday, September 13.  Apply now!

Applicants will be notified shortly after the application period closes. Registration for the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference is open until Friday, October 4th.

For more information, please contact:

Meredith Farkas
meredith.farkas@pcc.edu

2018-19 ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship Report

Last month we posted an update on the 2018-19 ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship recipients’ collaboration to put together an information literacy instruction workshop.   Since then, Sherry Loennig and Sally Jo Mielke have put together a report with more details about the collaboration between Eastern Oregon University and the Powder River School District.  Please take a moment to read the full report.

Update on K-12/Academic librarian collaboration scholarship recipients

In February ACRL-OR awarded a Collaboration scholarship to Sally Mielke of Eastern Oregon University and Sherry Loennig of North Powder Charter School.  ACRL-OR checked in with them this month and they shared the following report on their progress (edited slightly for clarity and length).

Planning the Workshop

After receiving notification of the scholarship, we met to plan for implementation of the project.  We discussed plans for a half-day workshop, to include information literacy instruction.  In addition to looking at possible dates for the workshop we also worked to begin planning a pre-workshop meeting to talk with teachers about priorities for information literacy instruction.

Sherry identified three teachers who would participate in the workshop, the High School Language Arts/PE/Health/Social Studies teacher, Middle/High School Science teacher, and Middle/High School Language Arts/Computer teacher. Sherry also set up a meeting with school administration to discuss the project.  Winter weather and bad road conditions derailed-several in person meetings but on March 27th, we met with the North Powder teachers to discuss the content and plan a date for the workshop.

Based on the teachers’ meeting, the information literacy instruction priorities were identified to include:

  • developing a research question
  • search strategies using online resources
  • types of online resources
  • evaluation of online resources

The teachers also expressed interest in developing online course/subject research guides to be hosted on a “to-be-created” library web page off the school website. Sally agreed to create a template using Google Sites, that teachers could then customize for particular courses or subject areas, and Sherry will work with district IT to have a library web page created. Sherry and the North Powder teachers were tasked with identifying a date in April or May for the workshop.

Holding the Workshop

Due to school/teacher schedule conflicts, we were not able to hold the workshop in April/May, and rescheduled for June 25.  At the workshop we enjoyed a morning of working together discussing information literacy instruction for North Powder students and possibilities for continued outreach and collaboration.  Sherry plans to follow up with an evaluation from the teachers, and we will create a report to submit for the project as a whole.

Publicity

Sally notified EOU Library Director and Administration of the scholarship award, and North Powder Administration included a report on the scholarship for the upcoming board meeting and a small article was included in the school newspaper.

Visit the ACLR-OR website for more information about the ACRL-OR Collaboration scholarship and stay tuned to the blog for the final project report.

Call for Proposals: ACRL WA-OR Joint Fall Conference

Whiteness and Racism in Academic Libraries: Dismantling Structures of Oppression

The Fall 2019 conference takes place amongst intensified organizing of white nationalists on college campuses, continued brutality against black and brown communities, policies that restrict immigration and border movement, and policing of body rights. In libraries we are making strategic claims towards equity, diversity and inclusion, yet our profession remains centered on cultures of white supremacy.

This conference is an effort to openly acknowledge the ways that whiteness and racism are supported in our libraries, and strategies for practicing anti-racism across the breadth of our work. The goal is to explicitly name the racist hegemony that underpins libraries and library work. Intersectional anti-racist practices must be central to our work in order to resist causing further harm. Investigations into how racism operates in tandem with white supremacy are essential to our work of making libraries sites of equity and social justice. This conference calls on each of us to take active engagement in understanding and learning about racism in libraries, making ourselves and our library systems those that resist oppression.

We invite proposals to join and extend these conversations. Sessions will consist of presentations, facilitated conversations, or trainings and workshops. While theory and praxis are central to this work, we seek sessions that help library workers to examine and name racialized power dynamics, and to practice building anti-oppressive communities and services. We recognize that anti-racism work is not perfect, and we expect proposals may include lessons learned for approaches that did not go as planned. Proposals that highlight these lessons learned should keep the focus on the ongoing work of dismantling racism and those most impacted by it.

Example topics for presentations and workshops may include, but are not limited to:

  • Addressing white fragility and its impacts in libraries
  • Policy audits and changes
  • Resisting white nationalist organizing
  • Leadership, recruitment and hiring practices that support library workers of color
  • Support, retention and graduation of students of color
  • Experiences of library workers and students of color
  • Activism and programming that centers students of color
  • Addressing and resisting cultures of white supremacy
  • Affinity and caucus organizing in libraries
  • Bystander intervention training
  • Lessons learned from interventions, policy changes, programming, etc.

How to Submit

Submit your proposals using our online form by August 9, 2019.

https://forms.gle/LKCDovn6fb4KzgzH6

Resources

If you are just beginning to engage with racism and whiteness and need a starting point, we recommend beginning with Tema Okun’s white supremacy cultureJennifer Brown, Jennifer Ferretti, Sofia Leung, and Marisa Mendez-Brady’s 2018 article We Here: Speaking Our Truth; Robin DiAngelo’s book White Fragility: Why It’s Hard for White People To Talk About Racism; and Lorin Jackson and LaQuanda Onyemeh’s web-based forum WOC+Lib.

Questions

ACRL WA-OR Joint Conference is held on October 24-25, 2019 the the Pack Forest Conference Center in Eatonville, WA.

For questions or comments contact president@acrlwa.org

 

Mark Watson appointed as interim Dean of the University of Oregon Libraries

Headshot of Mark Watson

Mark Waston, Interim Dean of Libraries, University of Oregon

On June 10 the University of Oregon announced that Mark Watson, associate dean for research services, UO libraries, has been named interim dean of UO libraries. Watson has worked in various capacities in the UO libraries since 1986, including stints as interim head of UO science libraries and co-interim dean of libraries. He will begin this new role starting July 9. ACRL-OR caught up with the incoming interim dean to answer a few questions about his new role:

What can you tell us about why Adrienne Lim (current dean UO Libraries) is leaving and where she is going?

Adriene Lim has accepted a position as Dean of Libraries at the University of Maryland in College Park.  Dean Lim is a recognized leader in the national academic library community, and her record of achievement, leadership and scholarship has been recognized and rewarded by this offer to take the helm at one of the country’s largest research libraries.  As a respected leader at the University of Oregon, she will be sorely missed.

What do you most look forward to as interim dean?

As interim Dean, I will have the opportunity to work directly under the University’s Vice President and Provost for Academic Affairs.  Involvement at this level of governance and the opportunity to help shape the academic direction of the institution is an exciting prospect.  Within the library, I look forward to working with the same great team of colleagues but in new ways.  As the interim Dean, I will be able to deepen and extend my efforts to support them in providing excellent library service to the campus community.

What is the biggest challenge you see in the year to come for the UO libraries?

Like many of its peers, the University of Oregon is dealing with a downturn in enrollment, especially when it comes to international students, with the consequence that all sectors of the institution are facing funding constraints.  It will be challenging to maintain fiscal balance and still deliver the quality service that faculty and students have come to expect.  This challenge extends to both maintaining adequate levels of staffing and the library’s ability to build collections commensurate with teaching and research needs.

What can you tell us about the search process for a permanent dean?

The UO is facing the prospect of recruiting several new Deans during the coming year; however, the stated expectation is that a search for a permanent Dean of Libraries will commence sometime in the fall.

Anything else you’d like the Oregon academic library community to know?

As interim Dean, I will have the opportunity to attend more meetings and conferences where I hope to meet new colleagues and interact with people I already know.  I look forward to making new connections with my Oregon colleagues!

ACRL-OR extends our best wishes to Mark Watson and to the UO Libraries during this interim leadership and search for a new dean of UO Libraries.

OSU Undergraduate Research and Writing Studio wins ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award

Undergrad Research and Writing Studio Awardees

The Oregon State University Libraries and Press (OSULP) has been awarded the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award for 2019 for their Undergraduate Research and Writing Studio. Opened in 2017, the Studio provides a place for undergraduate students to work on writing projects and receive assistance with writing and research from trained peers. The Studio is a collaboration between the Writing Center and the OSULP. The implementation and ongoing steering team includes Writing Center and OSULP staff, including: Dennis Bennett, Chris Ervin, and Vanessa Petroj from the Writing Center and Anne-Marie Deitering, Beth Filar Williams, Uta Hussong-Christian, Hannah Gascho Rempel and Jane Nichols from the library.

The award includes recognition in the C&RL News, a plaque, and $3000.

ACRL-OR was able to ask a few questions of the team. Their answers are provided below (ACRL also published a short interview).

Our heartiest congratulations to OSULP and to the implementation team on this prestigious award. Read on for some of their comments.

Who or what was the driving force behind creating the Studio?

Jane: There was a pressing need for more space for the writing center because they were outgrowing their space. At the same time there was a rising idea of reclaiming and re-invigorating the space where tutoring was happening in the library, the Collaborative Learning Center (CLC). The library had been aware of the trend of library – writing center partnerships and locating the campus writing center in the library. The Associate University Librarian for Learning Spaces, Anne-Marie Deitering, and the Writing Center Director, Dennis Bennett, began talking about partnering with an eye towards addressing respective service goals centered on student learning and success. As discussions progressed, the idea to move into the library gained traction and was approved by senior leadership by both the library and the writing center. Following this, a team was tasked with carrying out the project.

An important foundation to the relationship is the creation of a Memorandum of Understanding which outlines various aspects of the terms of agreement and includes substantive calls for the partners to collaborate on issues such as learning outcomes, service design, assessment, and training.

What was the collaboration process like between librarians, writing center staff, and media specialists?

Beth Filar Williams and Uta Hussong-Christian: The nine months we all worked together on the implementation team was truly a collaborative process. Over the duration of our well-organized and facilitated bi-weekly meetings, we used a service design process to develop a shared holistic student-focused framework for the project. In the process of working through space and service concepts and eventually plans, we learned a lot about each other as individuals and about what our respective units did. This helped us compromise in ways that worked for everyone. By the time the space opened, we had laid the groundwork for our partnership as we went through the ups and downs of the first year (and beyond) of Research & Writing Studio operations.

What did writing center folks learn about the library/librarians that was new to them and what did librarians learn about writing center folks that was new to them?

Jane Nichols: As librarians we were unfamiliar with the extensive training, much of it focused on theory and pedagogical concepts, that the student writing consultants received. We appreciated seeing the consultants be open to learning about the theoretical foundations to their work.

Chris Ervin: Something I already knew as an experienced academic is that there is more happening within other disciplines than those of us who are disciplinary outsiders understand. Working alongside librarians and in the physical space of the library has shown me some of the inner workings of the discipline of librarianship, in particular where those inner workings come into contact with the Studio. For example, we in writing centers and writing studies don’t tend to think of the work we do as “service,” but rather as teaching and mentoring. There’s even a debate within our discipline about whether to consider first-year writing as a “service course” (in service to the other disciplines) or as an introduction to the discipline of writing studies. Librarians, however, often use language like that—service points, service models, etc., but I understand better what that means now. The “information seeking process” that’s iterative is very much like our studio pedagogy approach, also iterative. Librarians must suffer a fundamental misunderstanding (from the public, students, faculty) of the work they do, just like writing center professionals. One place that misunderstanding comes into the Studio is in what students think of the role of our research consultants. Students, I believe, want to see the research consultant’s role as serving their information needs rather than teaching them skills that will help them meet their own information needs. As a writing center professional whose priority is facilitating student learning through teaching (classroom or one-to-one), I see the potential for research consultants to practice the studio pedagogy we associate with writing consultations—the process-focused, metacognitive kinds of conversations that would encourage research writers to investigate their own research processes and to advance their information literacy skills.

What do you see as the next steps for the Studio?

Beth: I would like to continue to grow the partnership and iterate as we learn more from assessment. I hope we can integrate Student Mulitmedia Services better maybe in an adjacent space? And I hope we get a better referral process to library liaisons and to other resources.

What are you all going to use the $3000 for?

Chris: The four members of the Studio Steering Committee have agreed that the funds will be used mostly or fully to support the Studio’s food pantry. Because Oregon State University’s students, like college students around the country, wrestle with food indsecurity, we created a pantry in the Studio for our student staff. The $3000 will be used to stock the pantry for at least a year, possibly more.

Hannah, this comes on the heels of you being selected as the ACRL IS Featured Teaching Librarian in 2018. Is it safe to say you’re now a library rock star?

Hannah: Hannah who? In other news, tickets are on sale now for my upcoming world-wide tour “Curiouser and Curiouser.”

Anything else you want the Oregon academic library community to know about this award or about the Studio?

Beth: We welcome visitors and conversation as we grow our knowledge, our services, and learn about best practices.