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Data Science Institute at OHSU in November

LogoTree_v5The OHSU Library is hosting the Data Science Institute from November 6-8 in Portland.

The institute will bring together researchers, students, and librarians for a data science immersion event. The curriculum is targeted to beginner level participants, and the schedule is available here: https://ohsulibrary-datascienceinstitute.github.io/

Individuals can complete this form to register for the Institute. The Institute is free, but space is limited.  Registrations will be reviewed and selection notifications will be sent by August 31, 2017.

Contact OHSULibraryDataScienceInstitute@ohsu.edu with any questions.

2017 ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence Nomination Period Now Open

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence is given annually for a project or initiative, undertaken by an individual or a group, that has significantly improved Oregon academic libraries or librarianship.

The award will be presented at the ACRL-Washington/Oregon Joint Fall Conference (October 19-20, 2017 at Pack Forest) and the winner(s) will also be recognized at the Oregon Library Association Annual Conference Award Ceremony on April 20, 2018 in Eugene. The winner (if group, one individual only) will receive registration to the ACRL Washington/Oregon Joint Fall Conference; group members will receive an engraved plaque.

2017 award for excellence

Who can be nominated:

Any individual or group in Oregon may apply or be nominated (self–nominations are accepted).  Individuals or groups that include at least one employee of an academic library may be given priority consideration. Project members do not need to be ACRL-OR members.  The initiative or project that is the basis of the nomination must have occurred in the previous three years.

Deadline:

Nominations must be received by September 17, 2017 at 11:59 p.m.

Notification:

The award winner(s) will be notified by September 27, 2017.

Questions:

Please contact the ACRL-Oregon President at acrlor@olaweb.org.

Reminder Call for Proposals: 2017 ACRL Washington & Oregon Joint Fall Conference

This is a reminder that proposals for this year’s ACRL Washington & Oregon joint conference are DUE THIS FRIDAY AUGUST 11th by 11:59pm.

This year’s theme is “Tried & True or Shiny & New?” you are invited to join us on October 19th and 20th to share ideas and inspirations, build community, and enjoy the idyllic setting at Pack Forest Conference Center in Eatonville, WA.  There are many ways to engage with your fellow librarians at Pack Forest this year:

  • Can you talk for 7 minutes about a time that you tried something and it didn’t work out? Propose a Fail Talk!
  • Want to share the results of the hard work you’ve been doing? Submit a poster!
  • Looking for a chance to bring together a few colleagues to offer insights about a particular topic? Plan a panel discussion!

Link to submit proposals is http://bit.ly/ACRLWAOR17

Deadline is this Friday, August 11th at 11:59pm. Accepted presentations will be notified August 22nd.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact ACRLWA President Eli Gandour-Rood at egandourrood@pugetsound.edu or ACRLWA Vice-President Madeline Mundt at mundtm@uw.edu.

 

 

 

Maureen Flanagan Battistella awarded ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship

The final 2016-2017 ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship has been awarded to Maureen Flanagan Battistella of Southern Oregon University.

Photograph of Maureen Battistella

Maureen Flanagan Battistella, Southern Oregon University

This scholarship is designed to allow ACRL-OR members the chance to apply for awards of up to $250 to attend conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities three times throughout the year. You can find out more about the multiple scholarship opportunities ACRL-OR provides on the ACRL-OR Scholarships page.

Battistella will use her award to attend the American Association for State and Local History 2017 Annual Conference next month in Austin, TX. While Battisstella has an MLS, she currently holds as assistant professor affiliate and research anthropologist appointment in SOU’s Sociology and Anthropology Program. Battistella partners with Hannon Library colleagues, Jackson County Library staff, and others to create “unique digital collections that tell the stories of Southern Oregon.” Her projects have been funded by the Erath Family Foundation (document wine in Southern Oregon), Rogue Valley Winegrowers Association, the Oregon Heritage Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities (Common Heritage grant to document agricultural and logging family histories), and most recently, LSTA.

Battistella presented on aspects of her work at the 2016 OLA Annual Conference  and plans on submitting another proposal for OLA 2018.

Are you looking for support to attend a professional development event of your own? Applications for the ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship are reviewed three times a year. The next deadline is November 30, 2017.

~ Uta Hussong-Christian, ACRL-OR Past President
Oregon State University Libraries & Press

Call for Hosting Institutions – ALADN 2019 Conference

Is your institution interested in making a proposal to host a future ALADN (Academic Library Advancement and Development Network) Conference? This is a great opportunity to showcase your city and host a valuable conference on library development and communications. The conference runs for two days, with an additional day for a pre-conference and conference welcome.

ALADN has created a more formal structure to help potential hosting institutions understand and anticipate the responsibilities that come along with hosting the conference and to select future sites. The ALADN Site Selection Committee works with institutions that would like to host an upcoming conference.

If your institution or a group of institutions would like to be considered as a host for an ALADN conference, please click here to apply. A proposal should consider:

  • Travel time and expense for attendees to the conference city/host location;
  • Your ability to negotiate and contract with a local hotel for a room block, meeting rooms, and meals;
  • Your institution’s ability to manage registration payments and hotel and restaurant invoices (including any alcohol served);
  • Vendor sponsorship solicitations;
  • Staffing to lead local hosting needs (registration desk, restaurant and meal negotiation, giveaways, accommodations for speakers, etc.)

For more information, please see:  http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/aladn/hosting.htm

For questions, please contact Sian Brannon, Associate Dean for Collection Management, UNT Libraries, sian.brannon@unt.edu

What’s Happening with Statewide Database Licensing?

Text by Arlene Weible, State Library of Oregon and Lynda Irons, Pacific University


Logo for the State Library of OregonThe State Library of Oregon licenses electronic resources and databases for use by academic, school, public, and tribal libraries in Oregon. These resources are available at no cost to Oregon libraries through the Statewide Database Licensing Program (SDLP). This program is supported in whole by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) through the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA).

Currently, SDLP resources include a suite of Gale/Cengage Learning databases and LearningExpress Library. The State Library’s contract with Gale/Cengage Learning expires in July 2018, so work is currently underway on a Request for Proposal (RFP) for a new contract.

Learning Express Logo

The Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee (SDLAC) works closely with State Library staff to develop the RFP and evaluate proposals. The committee has representatives from all types of libraries, including these academic librarians

  • Karen Kunz, Oregon Institute of Technology, representing public academic institutions
  • Lynda Irons, Pacific University, representing private academic institutions
  • Amy Hofer, Statewide Open Education Library Services, representing community colleges

SDLAC members have developed category descriptions and evaluation rubrics, ranging from what is not acceptable to what is desirable for each category, including

  • Academic Journal Database
  • General Online Encyclopedia
  • General Periodical Resources
  • Reference Resources
  • Contemporary Issues Resources
  • Lifelong Learning and Skills Courses

Academic librarians have provided leadership for the SDLAC as it moves through the RFP development and evaluation process. Previous chair Emily Miller-Francisco (Southern Oregon University) and current chair Lynda Irons as well as the other academic library representatives have particularly worked on developing evaluation criteria for the academic journal database category of the RFP.

Here is the timeline for remaining RFP activities:

September 21, 2017 SDLAC Meeting – Finalize RFP content
November 2017 RFP posted
January-March 2018 Proposals evaluated by SDLAC
Spring 2018 SDLAC Meeting – Finalize recommendation
May 2018 LSTA Council Meeting – Approval of recommendation and LSTA FFY 2018 budget approved
June 2018 OSL Board Meeting – Approval of recommendation and LSTA FFY 2018 budget finalized
June-July, 2018 New Contract finalized
July 31, 2018 Gale contract ends

If you would like to provide feedback to the academic library representatives, their contact information as well as other information about the program is available on the Statewide Database Licensing Program web site.

Making an Entrance: Portland Community College Cascade Library Gets a New Look

Written by Kate Rubick, Lewis & Clark College
Photos by Kate Rubick, Lewis & Clark College


A former Portland Community College (PCC) student returned to the Cascade campus recently and was overheard on the plaza outside the library entrance recollecting, “I just know this is where the cafeteria used to be.” Indeed it was, and although the improvements to the Cascade Library are self-evident, having a point of reference for how the building was organized prior to the remodel is extremely helpful in appreciating it.

(Click each thumbnail in the gallery below for the full photo and caption information.)

Many years ago I worked as a substitute librarian at the PCC Cascade Library, so I was familiar with both its charms and its quirks–the most noticeable of which was that the old library did not have a proper entrance. The curved bank of windows that flank the rear of the library, on North Portland’s Killingsworth Avenue, have always given it visual prominence–at least from that vantage point. But the entrance to the building, which was known as the Student Center, was around the side; nondescript doors leading to a dark corridor from which one could access the cafeteria, several offices, and also the library. Torie Scott, Faculty Librarian and Department Co-Chair, showed me around the new digs and recalled the former corridor with wryness, “I used to think of it as the birth canal.”

The approach to the library now is open and welcoming and faces the central campus mall. Scott said that one of the campus architectural goals is to create line-of-sight along the mall from the west to the east of campus. From the library’s plaza, situated above the mall, the view of campus is noteworthy. Another benefit is that the entrance is now clearly marked “Library,” making it one of the few buildings on campus with exterior signage that signifies the function of the space.

Visitors enter from the plaza into a new vestibule, with low, upholstered seating and walls of windows. The vestibule provides an elegant transitional space between the plaza and the interior library. Two-story glass walls separate it from the library space, so it provides an ideal setting for conversation, although Scott said she more often sees people using it for study. Cascade library users value quiet space, and noise-prevention was a major theme of the remodel. “It was all about the sound,” says Scott. The space was designed in the 1970s as two stories with a floating mezzanine, which creates–as any library space connoisseur knows–noise problems. Solutions included:

  • Relocating Research Help Desk to be in area with closed ceilings (and close to the entrance for better visibility).
  • Rearranging furniture and shelving in a section of the atrium to create a quiet study area.
  • Moving Check Out Desk back a couple of feet to shelter it underneath a balcony overhang, instead of allowing it to protrude out into atrium.
  • Adding baffling material to atrium walls.

These changes helped mitigate noise while still emphasizing the beauty of the vertical space and natural light in the library. Scott reports that noise complaints have gone down in the year they have occupied the improved space. In addition, library users now have access to a silent study room. The remodel was completed in summer 2016 by Hacker Architects, Hoffman Construction and Czopek Design Studio, and it was part of a larger PCC building project funded by a property tax bond measure approved by voters in 2008. Other improvements included new restrooms on both floors (including a gender-neutral option), a new library classroom on the second floor, and the addition of a computing ledge on the mezzanine balcony. Modern new furnishings–soft seating as well as popular standing desks–complement existing wood chairs, carrels and tables. The collection was downsized somewhat to make room for additional study space and to accommodate shorter shelving in the atrium spaces. On the second floor, where most of the collection resides, comfy chairs greet readers at the ends of the rows overlooking the vestibule.

(Click each thumbnail in the gallery below for the full photo and caption information.)

The renovation required staff to relocate for a year. A bare-bones service point was set up in a building across the mall; the eight-person staff had to basically share one room. The forced proximity helped break down barriers between units. It was cramped but cozy, remembers Scott, “we all got to know each other really well,” and the rapport has carried over and impacts “the way we work with one another in the new space.” Though they opted to keep the Check Out and Research Help desks separate, faculty librarians and access services staff have a newfound appreciation for how their colleagues work, which ultimately has a positive impact on service. A beautiful new space with a graceful entrance and increased harmony amongst the staff? Improved acoustics notwithstanding, I’d call that a loud-and-clear win.


Kate Rubick, ACRL-OR Member at Large (2015-2017)
Instruction Services Librarian, Lewis & Clark College
rubick@lclark.edu

Need $250 for Professional Development?

The deadline to apply for the final round of the Professional Development Scholarships is Monday, July 31, 2017! Up to two $250 scholarships may be awarded this round.

The ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarships may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities. All ACRL-Oregon members may apply. Please visit our scholarship page as well as our FAQ, which contains more information on the evaluation process. To apply, use the online form.

Questions? Contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Stephanie Debner
ACRL-OR President, 2016-2017
stephanie.debner@mhcc.edu
Mt. Hood Community College

Call for Proposals: 2017 ACRL Washington & Oregon Joint Fall Conference

This year’s theme is “Tried & True or Shiny & New?” and colleagues across the Northwest are invited to join us on October 19th and 20th to share ideas and inspirations, build community, and enjoy the idyllic setting at Pack Forest Conference Center in Eatonville, WA.

Proposals that consider the ways in which the tension between innovation and tradition is present in our professional lives are welcomed. How do we address those tensions? Is there an inherent conflict between our roles as librarians in the past, and our roles in the present and going into the future? Some questions which might be raised or answered in your proposal could include: what can be lost by refusing to change? What can be gained by preserving established practices? Are there areas of our work which require constant transformation or are in need of meticulous constancy?

Please consider submitting your proposal for a workshop, presentation, panel discussion, or (new this year!) a poster or a 7 minute “Fail Talk” sharing an experience you’ve had with failure.

Submit your proposal, including title, abstract (300 word max), and presentation type here.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: August 11th, 2017. Accepted presentations will be notified August 22nd.

 

Need Research Guide Inspiration?

The newest addition to the ACRL webinar archive is Essentials of Usability Design for Library Research Guides. This webinar was originally broadcast on March 8, 2017.

Access to these ACRL e-Learning webinars is a benefit of ACRL-OR membership, thus a librarian holding membership must sponsor any planned webinar event. These webinars can be used as professional development opportunities for your library or small group gathering, but please note that ACRL stipulates that these webinars are only for single-location viewing.

To schedule a webinar viewing, please use the following guidelines:

  1. An ACRL-OR member librarian must sponsor the webinar viewing event and serve as the designated event contact.
  2. Choose an archived webinar from the list of available webinars.
  3. Check the webinar calendar to be sure the webinar you want is available on the date of your event.
  4. Request webinar access by emailing ACRL-OR Board Communications Coordinator, Aja.Bettencourt-McCarthy; include the webinar title and date of your event (your request will be added to the webinar calendar).
  5. Please abide by ACRL’s (national) guidelines for chapter use of these webinars: ACRL national provides chapters with limited complimentary access to these webinars to encourage chapter programming, up to 6 remote logins are available. Thus the viewing event is not limited to a single location. However, the designated contact should not share the login information with more than 6 remote attendees (including themselves). These are ACRL’s limitations in exchange for complimentary access; ACRL-OR asks that you respect these limitations.