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“Receiving this award was an honor”: Past ACRL-OR Awards for Excellence revisited!

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence recognizes a project that demonstrates excellence in the field by significantly improving Oregon academic libraries or librarianship. Help us recognize the work of our colleagues — your nominations matter!

As this year’s nominations open, we’re checking in with past recipients to get project updates and hear what the award meant for them. The 2016 award went to the Open Oregon Educational Resources project . We caught up with project rep Amy Hofer to reflect on the award and the status of the project.

  1. What did receiving this award mean to you or your team?

Receiving this award was an honor. Recognition from my Oregon library peers, an awesome bunch of librarians, really means so much to me. Coming just a year after John Schoppert at Columbia Gorge Community College received the Award for Excellence for his OER efforts shows that our community cares deeply about access to resources and student success.

  1. How has this project evolved or changed since receiving the award?

Open Oregon Educational Resources started in 2015 with my hire as the OER Librarian for Oregon’s 17 community colleges. Starting this year, the state is adding the 7 public universities to my docket as well.  

  1. What’s an excellent thing happening in or around our profession that you’re really excited about?

Librarians are the leaders when it comes to textbook affordability. Our roles and work are changing to accommodate different aspects of OER projects. At the same time, there is more public discussion of work-life balance and understanding that we can’t just keep adding to our already-full plates. We have a real opportunity to evolve sustainably.

  1. Why should someone nominate a project for the ACRL-OR Award for Excellence?

Because it’s always a good feeling to bring attention to good work!

More information on the nomination process and past winners can be found on the ACRL-Oregon website. The nomination period closes at 11:59pm on August 31, 2018.

 

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ACRL-OR Award for Excellence: Now Accepting Nominations

The ACRL-Oregon board is now accepting nominations for the Award for Excellence.

What does the award acknowledge?

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence shall be given to recognize a project that demonstrates excellence in the field by significantly improving Oregon academic libraries or librarianship.

Who is eligible?

  • Any individual or group in Oregon may apply or be nominated. Individuals or groups that include at least one employee of an academic library may be given priority consideration.
  • Initiative or project that is the basis of the nomination must have occurred in the previous three years.
  • This is not a lifetime achievement award.
  • ACRL-Oregon membership is NOT required.
  • Nominee or nominated group may include a member of the ACRL-Oregon Board; however they must recuse themselves from the voting process.

What does the award cover?

  • An engraved plaque
  • Recognition at the ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference
  • One paid registration for the recipient to attend the ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

More information and past winners can be found on the ACRL-Oregon website.  The nomination period will close at 11:59pm on August 31, 2018.  Submit a nomination now.

For questions, please contact:

Steve Silver
ACRL-Oregon President
acrlor@olaweb.org

ACRL-OR Board: Nominations Closing Soon!

Interested in meeting other fantastic academic librarians and serving the academic library community in Oregon? Is there someone you know that would be a shining addition to the ACRL-OR Board? Here is an opportunity to get involved! The ACRL-OR Board is looking for candidates to run in our upcoming spring elections.

The open positions are:

  • 1 Vice-President/President Elect (3-year term)
  • 2 Members-at-Large (2-year term)

View position descriptions and responsibilities for more information.

How to nominate:

To nominate yourself, a colleague, or an employee, submit our online nomination form. The nomination period will close on Monday, April 23rd.

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and ACRL national
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

Questions?

Email Meredith Farkas (meredith.farkas@pcc.edu), who is the current Vice-President/President Elect, if you have any questions or concerns about the open positions.

Thanks,

The ACRL-OR Nominating Committee
Meredith Farkas
Molly Gunderson
Janet Tapper

Congratulations to ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship recipients!

ACRL Oregon and Scholarship Committee are happy to announce two recipients for this round of the Professional Development Scholarship. They are:

Serenity Ibsen, from the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Serenity will be attending the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) annual conference as a director representing the Association of Independent Colleges of Art & Design (AICAD). While there, she will attend workshops on cultivating critical, reflective, and radical pedagogical practices in art librarianship.

Additionally, knowledge gained from attendance at ARLIS/NA will help Serenity as a member of the accreditation team for her college to develop a systematized information literacy plan.

Stephanie Debner, from the University of Western States. Stephanie is attending the 2018 Institute on Supporting Clinical Care, where she will learn more about evidence-based clinical practices (EBCP) for health science librarians. Having a strong understanding of this topic is essential step towards learning how to meet student needs and skill acquisition.

Stephanie will apply the experience of what she learns to the classroom and one-on-one student teaching.

Congratulations again to Serenity and Stephanie!

 

Register now for ACRL Preconference Sessions at OLA

ACRL-Oregon is sponsoring two preconference sessions  at this year’s Oregon Library Association Conference  that will be of interest to academic librarians across the state!  The preconference sessions are from 8am-5pm, Wednesday, April 18th in Eugene, OR.  Please consider signing up for one or both of them!

8am-12noon

Southern Oregon University faculty member Maureen Flanagan Battistella will lead a preconference sharing How to Document Oregon’s Thousand Points of Life: Techniques and Technologies to Engage Your Community Using an Oral History Project with a fantastic panel of university faculty and librarians. You can check out their Stories of Southern Oregon digital collection where they collected their local oral histories.

1pm-5pm

Portland Community College librarian Pam Kessinger will lead a panel along with faculty from PCC’s Developmental Education program to explore Metacognition and Reading Strategies to Bridge Students Toward Inquiry. Librarians will learn how to use the Reading Apprenticeship framework as well as our own ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to develop meaningful information literacy instruction and student reflection. This session is co-sponsored with the Library Instruction Round Table.

Can’t make the whole conference?  Did you know you can sign up for OLA preconferences without paying to attend the full OLA Conference? Take advantage of attending one or both of the preconference sessions ($55 per session) and then, (lucky you!)  Join your ACRL colleagues from 5:00-7:00pm for the ACRL-Oregon Reception at the First National Taphouse. We hope to see you there!

ACRL-OR Board: Call for nominations

ACRL-Oregon logo

Interested in meeting other fantastic academic librarians and serving the academic library community in Oregon? Is there someone you know that would be a shining addition to the ACRL-OR Board? Here is an opportunity to get involved! The ACRL-OR Board is looking for candidates to run in our upcoming spring elections.

 

The open positions are:

  • 1 Vice-President/President Elect (3-year term)
  • 2 Members-at-Large (2-year term)

View position descriptions and responsibilities for more information.

How to nominate:

To nominate yourself, a colleague, or an employee, submit our online nomination form. The nomination period will close on Monday, April 23rd.

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and ACRL national
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

Questions?

Email Meredith Farkas (meredith.farkas@pcc.edu), who is the current Vice-President/President Elect, if you have any questions or concerns about the open positions.

Thanks,

The ACRL-OR Nominating Committee
Meredith Farkas
Molly Gunderson
Janet Tapper

Apply Today: ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship

ACRL-Oregon seeks to foster collaboration between academic librarians and school librarians. The role of school librarians is vitally important and is in many ways interrelated with the work of academic librarians and the students we all serve.  This year ACRL-OR has up to $1000.00 of scholarship funds still available to support projects.

How can the scholarship be used?
This funding opportunity covers any collaboration between at least one school librarian and at least one academic librarian that the applicant(s) can make a good case for. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Sponsorship to attend, exhibit, or present at a relevant conference (OASL, regional conferences, or others)
  • Creation of programming, such as a conference, workshop, unconference, or pre-conference
  • Work on a collaborative research project
  •  Something else we haven’t thought of!

Examples of past awards include:

Who is eligible?

  • All Oregon academic and certified teacher librarians who are employed in a school library
  • Preference will be given to teams that include at least one ACRL-Oregon member and one OASL member in good standing
  • Preference will also be given to applicants who have not previously received a School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon

Who is not eligible?
Academic and school librarians outside of Oregon (unless part of a team of collaborators that includes at least one Oregon librarian).

How will applications be evaluated?
Reviewers will look for applications that:

  • Have at least one applicant who is a member of ACRL-Oregon and one who is a member of OASL
  • Demonstrate meaningful collaboration between school and academic librarians
  • Have the potential to favorably influence information literacy awareness/education in Oregon

Deadline
Applications are due by Sunday, April 1, 2018.  Apply online here.

For more information, please contact:

Steve Silver
ACRL-Oregon President, 2017-2018
Northwest Christian University
acrlor@olaweb.org

Sign up to attend ACRL-Oregon-sponsored Preconferences at OLA

OLA Conference posterACRL-Oregon is sponsoring two Preconferences at the Oregon Library Association Conference that will be of interest to academic librarians across the state. Please consider signing up for one or both of them!

Portland Community College librarian Pam Kessinger will be leading a panel with faculty from PCC’s Developmental Education program to explore “Metacognition and Reading Strategies to Bridge Students Toward Inquiry.” Librarians who teach will learn how the Reading Apprenticeship framework as well as our own ACRL Framework for Information Literacy can be used to develop meaningful information literacy instruction. This session is co-sponsored with the Library Instruction Round Table. 

In August 2017, ACRL-Oregon awarded Maureen Flanagan Battistella a professional development award to attend the American Association of State and Local History conference. Maureen’s attendance there was part of an ongoing project in partnership with colleagues at Southern Oregon University, Hannon Library, Jackson County Library, and others to  create “unique digital collections that tell the stories of Southern Oregon.”

Interested in learning more about Maureen’s research and how to engage your own community via an oral history project? Sign up to attend the pre-conference session she is leading, “How to Document Oregon’s Thousand Points of Life: Techniques and Technologies to Engage Your Community Using an Oral History Project” with a fantastic panel of university faculty and librarians.

Interested in having your own conference, workshop, or professional development project funded? Apply for an ACRL-Oregon professional development award now! Deadline for next consideration is February 28, 2018.

 

Reminder: Professional Development Scholarship Deadline Approaching

Thanks to a one-time matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $500 for each award for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the February 28 deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2017-2018 year:

  • February 28
  • April 30
  • November 30 (done)

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Steve Silver
ACRL-OR President, 2017-2018
Northwest Christian University
acrlor@olaweb.org

Interview with Michelle Bagley, Portland Community College

Michelle Bagley is a long-time Portland resident, but is new to Oregon libraries, having worked as the Library Director at Clark College in Vancouver, Washington for many years. She is now seven months into her role as Dean of the Library at Portland Community College.

Photo of Michelle Bagley

Michelle Bagley, Dean of the Library, Portland Community College

Tell us a little bit about your work background. How did you get into librarianship?

I was working in private industry and serving as a liaison to the inaugural First Book Local Advisory Board (Portland, OR) when I began considering a career change. One of the board members urged me to look into a career in librarianship. After some research and reflection I enrolled in the Emporia State SLIM program. I graduated in 2004 and began working in libraries shortly thereafter. Librarianship has been a terrific career path for me. I have been able to use my extensive management and customer service skills developed in my previous career and apply my passion for access to information and education.

What has been the greatest influence upon you so far in your career?

As a graduate student I strongly considered a career in corporate librarianship. This was due in large part to my educational background and work experience. I became a member of the Special Libraries Association (SLA) and the Oregon Special Libraries chapter. As a new librarian, volunteering in a professional association was instrumental in getting established in the profession. I attribute the relatively small membership and extremely diverse range of libraries represented in SLA in equipping me with the skills to advance pretty rapidly. My involvement with SLA gave me the opportunity to chair meetings, plan conferences and professional development events, to work on strategic planning, and to develop professional relationships to SLA leadership. I also joined the SLA Education Division and had the chance to work with some terrific library educators who were staunch advocates for the role of information literacy and libraries.

When I began working as the library director at Clark College (Vancouver, WA) I immediately became involved in consortium and state/system library leadership. Through participation in the Washington Library Leadership Council and the Orbis Cascade Alliance I was able to deepen my experience and work on initiatives with the goal to enhance library services and promote effective state/regional partnerships. Also I worked with leaders from across Clark College. Serving as a member of Instructional Council and other key college groups provided me with the opportunity to learn and contribute to the college’s work focused on student learning and success. As I progressed in my role at Clark we were able to bring other key academic supports into the same unit as the library.  In this transition I was able to take the lead on integrating tutoring, eLearning, student technology support, and faculty support into library services. This was a model we had put into practice at my first library job. This change in my responsibilities had a big impact on continuing to build my capacity as a college leader. I became much more involved in instructional planning and decision making.

What is an achievement in your career of which you’re particularly proud?

The achievement that I am most proud of, at this point in my career, was the work that I lead renovating sections of Clark College’s Cannell Library and developing a new student service area, Tech Hub. The development of Tech Hub originated during the revision of Clark’s comprehensive IT plan. A key outcome for the plan was to develop centralized student technology help. The partnership between IT, eLearning, and the library demonstrated the best of collaboration.

Shortly after the development of Tech Hub, the library presented a proposal to the Student Technology Fee Committee to fund a some necessary improvements to the library. The first part of the proposal was an update to the lower level of the library to accommodate a collaborative commons, including improvements to the electrical/data infrastructure in the library. The renovated space is beautiful and has become a destination for students looking for collaborative learning spaces. The second part of the project was a modification the second floor computer lab which presented some hazards for building evacuation and was consistently mentioned in the student satisfaction survey as being too crowded, too hot, and too loud. By moving roughly half of the computers from this lab to the new collaborative commons, the space became an inviting “quiet” computer lab.

I am proud of these projects because they demonstrate the things that I am most passionate about – listening to/observing library user needs, developing services based on these needs, and having a positive impact on learners.

What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

PCC Library is a very innovative library with a focus on instruction, student success, collaboration, assessment, and student-centered services. The library staff and faculty are very active contributors to work related to teaching and learning, assessment, and librarianship. They are strong partners in collaborative efforts at the college, in the Pacific Northwest, and nationally. These partnerships range from work with PCC faculty on integrating information literacy and library resources into to their courses, to advocating and promoting the use of Open Educational Resources, to developing new programs and services that provide access to library collections and technology across our service district.

What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

A big challenge that PCC Library is facing in the coming year is continued pressure on our budgets (which is likely a common theme at many academic libraries).

Also PCC has recently joined Achieving the Dream. This year is a planning year; the challenge is to find a balance between letting the foundational work occur and having the college include information literacy and the library into the re-imagined student experience.

What does advocacy for academic libraries look like from your perspective as a library director?

While the library director plays a key role in this work I have found advocacy is most effective when all library staff can speak a common message to the college community (and beyond). This is particularly important because academic libraries are multi-faceted – definitely academic in nature, strongly linked to student services, part of the college’s physical infrastructure, and a place for community engagement. We all can keep the library on the radar of college leaders and decision makers, develop and maintain solid collaborative relationships with faculty, student services and other college staff, and promote student-focused services and spaces.

This means that everyone working in an academic library benefits from being involved in library planning. Ideally each person has the capacity to highlight the library as an important campus learning space, communicate the importance of information literacy in our students’ learning, speak to the cultural importance of libraries for campuses, respond to the growing need to support our faculty and staff in their work. When library faculty and staff are actively involved in planning and operations in all areas and all levels of the college, the library benefits.

As the library director I have the responsibility to advocate for and demonstrate the impact that integrating academic libraries into the college’s instructional programs and student supports has on our students and our community. I am also responsible for creating an environment that prepares all library staff to be engaged in the conversations and activities.

Anything else you’d like Oregon academic librarians to know about you?

I am very excited to now live and work in Oregon. I am eager to get more involved in working with academic libraries, to learn more about specific initiatives that are important to Oregon libraries, to promote our value to students, faculty, and staff as well as to state leaders. I think it is crucial that we continue to advocate for libraries to ensure that libraries are involved in key educational initiatives, are funded to accomplish our objectives, and are recognized for the impact that we have locally, regionally, and nationally.