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Apply now: Scholarship applications open for ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

ACRL-OR has funds to award two scholarships to attend the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference. This year, the Washington chapter is hosting the conference on October 24 & 25 at the Pack Forest Conference Center in Washington. Apply now!

How can the scholarships be used?

The scholarship covers the registration fee of $155 for the conference, which includes room (dorm option) and meals.

Who is eligible?

This scholarship is designed for those who live and/or work in Oregon. For those who live and/or work in Washington, please refer to the ACRL-WA site for conference scholarship information. Those meeting at least one of the criteria below are eligible to apply.  Each criteria met will be awarded points in the evaluation process (see below under how the application will be evaluated).

  1. First-time attendee of the joint conference.
  2. ACRL-OR member.
  3. MLIS student in an ALA-accredited program who lives in Oregon.
  4. Paraprofessional employee in an Oregon academic library.
  5. Part-time or temporary employee in an Oregon academic library.

Who is not eligible?

  • Those who do not live and/or work in Oregon.
  • Those who meet none of the criteria described above.
  • Those who have received a Fall Conference Scholarship in the past.

How will applications be evaluated?

A point system will be used to rank applicant eligibility (First time attendee: 2 points; ACRL-OR member: 2 points; MLIS student: 1 point; Paraprofessional: 1 point; part-time or temporary employee: 1 point).  In addition, application essays will be evaluated for:

  1. Financial need.
  2. Interest in the conference theme/program.
  3. Plans to apply knowledge gained at the conference.

Deadline:

The deadline for the 2019 Fall Conference Scholarship applications will be Friday, September 13.  Apply now!

Applicants will be notified shortly after the application period closes. Registration for the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference is open until Friday, October 4th.

For more information, please contact:

Meredith Farkas
meredith.farkas@pcc.edu

Call for Proposals: ACRL WA-OR Joint Fall Conference

Whiteness and Racism in Academic Libraries: Dismantling Structures of Oppression

The Fall 2019 conference takes place amongst intensified organizing of white nationalists on college campuses, continued brutality against black and brown communities, policies that restrict immigration and border movement, and policing of body rights. In libraries we are making strategic claims towards equity, diversity and inclusion, yet our profession remains centered on cultures of white supremacy.

This conference is an effort to openly acknowledge the ways that whiteness and racism are supported in our libraries, and strategies for practicing anti-racism across the breadth of our work. The goal is to explicitly name the racist hegemony that underpins libraries and library work. Intersectional anti-racist practices must be central to our work in order to resist causing further harm. Investigations into how racism operates in tandem with white supremacy are essential to our work of making libraries sites of equity and social justice. This conference calls on each of us to take active engagement in understanding and learning about racism in libraries, making ourselves and our library systems those that resist oppression.

We invite proposals to join and extend these conversations. Sessions will consist of presentations, facilitated conversations, or trainings and workshops. While theory and praxis are central to this work, we seek sessions that help library workers to examine and name racialized power dynamics, and to practice building anti-oppressive communities and services. We recognize that anti-racism work is not perfect, and we expect proposals may include lessons learned for approaches that did not go as planned. Proposals that highlight these lessons learned should keep the focus on the ongoing work of dismantling racism and those most impacted by it.

Example topics for presentations and workshops may include, but are not limited to:

  • Addressing white fragility and its impacts in libraries
  • Policy audits and changes
  • Resisting white nationalist organizing
  • Leadership, recruitment and hiring practices that support library workers of color
  • Support, retention and graduation of students of color
  • Experiences of library workers and students of color
  • Activism and programming that centers students of color
  • Addressing and resisting cultures of white supremacy
  • Affinity and caucus organizing in libraries
  • Bystander intervention training
  • Lessons learned from interventions, policy changes, programming, etc.

How to Submit

Submit your proposals using our online form by August 9, 2019.

https://forms.gle/LKCDovn6fb4KzgzH6

Resources

If you are just beginning to engage with racism and whiteness and need a starting point, we recommend beginning with Tema Okun’s white supremacy cultureJennifer Brown, Jennifer Ferretti, Sofia Leung, and Marisa Mendez-Brady’s 2018 article We Here: Speaking Our Truth; Robin DiAngelo’s book White Fragility: Why It’s Hard for White People To Talk About Racism; and Lorin Jackson and LaQuanda Onyemeh’s web-based forum WOC+Lib.

Questions

ACRL WA-OR Joint Conference is held on October 24-25, 2019 the the Pack Forest Conference Center in Eatonville, WA.

For questions or comments contact president@acrlwa.org

 

Statement of concern about racist incidents at the ALA Midwinter Conference

ACRL-Oregon would like to echo and support the statement sent earlier by ACRL/NY regarding the reported verbal abuse of their member as well as to express concern about additional racist incidents at the ALA Midwinter Conference that were reported on social media.

ACRL-Oregon affirms our commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion and would like to see ALA uphold their commitment to creating inclusive spaces throughout their conferences, including in programs, the exhibit hall, social events, and governance meetings. While having a Statement of Appropriate Conduct is critical to ensuring victims of harassment have recourse, what matters most is how victims and the accused are treated in the investigative process. That one victim felt that she was being silenced during the process is concerning. Greater transparency should be provided to members of ALA’s elected governance structures about how reports are handled while respecting the privacy of those involved.

We appreciate the ACRL Executive Board’s statement and hope that it will ensure that structures are in place to address equity issues and limit racial trauma within our organization. We appreciate that both ALA and ACRL are committed to providing anti-bias training for leaders and hope that this is extended to staff as well.

While our profession is focused on serving our diverse communities, there is a history in this country of libraries and librarians upholding racism. The lack of diversity of our own profession reflects this. We can all do more to confront racism in our libraries and professional organizations and ACRL-Oregon is committed to this work as well.

The ACRL-Oregon Board
http://acrloregon.org

Sign up for OLA Preconference “Copyright Outreach, Education, and Advocacy on Campus”

ACRL-OR is proud to sponsor a preconference at this year’s joint OLA/WLA Conference! Please consider signing up for Copyright Outreach, Education, and Advocacy on Campus when you register for this year’s conference.

Academic library staff often have formal or informal copyright responsibilities on their campuses. Whether you are charged with creating copyright education for your campus community or just want some tools to chip away at the misinformation regarding copyright that you encounter from staff, students, and faculty, this interactive workshop is designed to help you design copyright outreach efforts that will work. Participants will leave with plans to either begin or extend copyright-related outreach from whatever role they occupy at their institution.

This preconference workshop is presented by Rachel Bridgewater from Portland Community College; Sue Kunda from Western Oregon University; and Patrick Wohlmut from Linfield College and takes place Wednesday, April 17th, from 8:30am – 12:30pm.

 

Last Chance to Register: ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference at Menucha

This is a friendly reminder that registration for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Fall Conference at Menucha is currently open and closes this Monday, October 1st!

Photo of ACRL OR 2018 Conference Mugs

2018 Conference Mugs

The theme of this year’s conference is Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, and Political.  The conference will focus on the full spectrum of advocacy work and how each of us can be better advocates when we work to influence decisions at any level. Attendees will leave the Conference with an elevator pitch and concrete plan to advocate for an issue important to them.

In addition, you’ll hear from keynote speakers:

  • Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and current ALA President
  • Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and 2016-17 ACRL President

and lightening talk presenters discussing issues including:

  • OERs
  • collection development as a form of advocacy
  • advocating for libraries through pedagogy
  • working with student affairs

For more information about the conference or to get registered, visit our conference website: http://bit.ly/acrlpnw18

See you at Menucha!

Register now for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference at Menucha

This is a friendly reminder that registration for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Fall Conference at Menucha is currently open and closes on October 1st.

Scholarships are available for those who live or work in Oregon! Information and application process can be found here. Application deadline for scholarships is September 13. Apply today!

The theme of this year’s conference is Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, and Political. Advocacy means so much more than just lobbying the government or our elected representatives. The Pacific Northwest is full of stories of librarians who have advocated for themselves, their patrons, their libraries, their profession, and their professional values. Our conference will focus on the full spectrum of advocacy work and how each of us can be better advocates when we work to influence decisions at any level. Attendees will leave the Conference with a concrete plan to advocate for an issue important to them.

Our keynote speakers are Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and current ALA President, and Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and 2016-17 ACRL President.

For more information about the conference or to get registered, visit our conference website: http://bit.ly/acrlpnw18

See you at Menucha!

Loida Garcia-Febo and Irene M.H. Herold at the 2018 ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference!

ACRL OR is excited to announce the keynote speakers for the 2018 Joint Fall Conference at Menucha.

Loida Garcia-Febo, President of Information New Wave and ALA President-Elect, will offer the opening keynote, and Irene M. H. Herold, librarian of the college at the College of Wooster in Ohio and ACRL Past President, will provide the closing keynote address. Garcia-Febo and Herold will share their experience and speak to the conference theme of “Reimagining Advocacy: Persona, Professional, Political.”  Read more about these speakers – and register! – at https://acrloregon.org/conferences/2018-acrl-or-wa-joint-conference/

 

Apply now: Scholarship applications open for ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference

ACRL-OR has funds to award up to nine (9) scholarships to attend the ACRL Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference. This year, the Oregon chapter is hosting the conference on October 25 & 26 at the Menucha Retreat & Conference Center. Apply now!

How can the scholarships be used?  

The scholarship covers the registration fee of $140 for the conference, which includes room (dorm option) and meals.  

Who is eligible?

This scholarship is designed for those who live and/or work in Oregon. For those who live and/or work in Washington, please refer to the ACRL-WA site for conference scholarship information. Those meeting at least one of the criteria below are eligible to apply.  Each criteria met will be awarded points in the evaluation process (see below under how the application will be evaluated).  

  1. First-time attendee of the joint conference.  
  2. ACRL-OR member.
  3. MLIS student in an ALA-accredited program who lives in Oregon.
  4. Paraprofessional employee in an Oregon academic library.
  5. Part-time or temporary employee in an Oregon academic library.

Who is not eligible?

  • Those who do not live and/or work in Oregon.
  • Those who meet none of the criteria described above.
  • Those who have received a Fall Conference Scholarship in the past.

How will applications be evaluated?

A point system will be used to rank applicant eligibility (First time attendee: 2 points; ACRL-OR member: 2 points; MLIS student: 1 point; Paraprofessional: 1 point; part-time or temporary employee: 1 point).  In addition, application essays will be evaluated for:

  1. Financial need.
  2. Interest in the conference theme/program.
  3. Plans to apply knowledge gained at the conference.   

Deadline:

The application period for the 2018 Fall Conference Scholarships will be Monday, August 13 to Thursday, September 13.  Apply now!

Applicants will be notified shortly after the application period closes. Registration for the ACRL Oregon & Washington Joint Fall Conference is open until Wednesday, October 1.

For more information, please contact:

Stephanie Debner, ACRL-OR Board Past President
sdebner@uws.edu
University of Western States

Submit a Proposal for a Lightning Talk or Poster

Please consider submitting a proposal to present an 8-minute lightning talk or a poster for the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference on October 25-26, 2018 at Menucha.

https://goo.gl/forms/KJOfCjRQFyaCRwdg1

The theme of this year’s conference is “Reimagining Advocacy: Personal, Professional, and Political.” Advocacy means so much more than just lobbying the government or our elected representatives (though it is that too!). The Pacific Northwest is full of stories of librarians who have advocated for themselves, their patrons, their libraries, their profession, and their professional values. Our conference will focus on the full spectrum of advocacy work and how each of us can be better advocates when we work to influence decisions at any level.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, August 31st, 2018.  Accepted proposals will be notified by Friday, September 14, 2018 and the conference registration deadline is October 1, 2018.

Please contribute to our two days of insightful and thought-provoking conversations at Menucha by submitting a proposal!

ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship: Reflections from ARLIS/NA 2018

As a new library director at Pacific Northwest College of Art, a small, independent art college, it’s essential to my college and my professional development that I am able to attend the annual conference of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA). Adjacent to the conference, there is an annual meeting of library directors from the Association of Independent Colleges of Art & Design (AICAD), a consortium of 42 art schools in the US and Canada. This year’s ACRL-Oregon Professional Development award supported my attendance at this preeminent conference for librarians in my field and allowed me to meet up with other AICAD Directors. In addition, it was my goal to eat as much New York pizza as possible, as I believe it is superior to all other pizza.  

My first day in New York was the AICAD library directors’ meeting at the School of Visual Arts library. I met several colleagues for the first time and we discussed timely issues to our communities including diversity and inclusion initiatives, overdue fines, our annual data reports, budgets, and future projects. It was enlightening and validating to speak with other directors, many of whom experience similar challenges in their institutions.

From there, I raced to Midtown to the conference hotel to attend the workshop, “From the Margins to the Center: Cultivating a Critical, Reflective, and Radical Practice in Art Librarianship,” lead by librarians from around the country who have been influential in incorporating critical pedagogy into library instruction. At PNCA we have been seeking more ways to include social justice work in every aspect of library services; this workshop allowed us to reflect on our current practices, what we seek for the future, and how best to serve our community. By the end of Sunday, I had eaten four slices of pizza.

The next day, the full conference began and I attended an interesting session on “Crashing the IR Party: Artists as scholars in Institutional Repositories.” My library developed, maintains, and acquires work by our community for our institutional repository, Mimi. Each presenter shared their challenges and triumphs in their varied experiences and I was most particularly interested in discussions around how to achieve buy-in from stakeholders. It seems that more institutions are collecting scholarship by artists and seeing how different platforms handle visual media was very informational.

Next, I attended a meeting of the Book Arts Special Interest Group, a new one for me. I was interested in hearing how other libraries and museums collect and provide access to artists’ publications in all forms. We discussed cataloging, acquisitions, and housing these collections as well. I got to see one of my favorite booksellers and artists, Marshall Weber, Collection Development Curator & Artist at Booklyn. This organization supports artists and activists and provides exhibition space in New York.

In 2017, a task force was formed to update the “Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines,” and Linden How, my coworker at PNCA, joined this group. At the conference she presented their recent iteration of this document that drew from the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy and the ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. In this workshop format, we provided feedback and asked questions. I am excited that this work is being done and look forward to seeing the new competencies next year. Today’s pizza slice count: 2.

Between sessions, I perused the posters including an interesting one about pest management and disaster planning. I visited the vendor hall and purchased a few excellent titles from Purgatory Pie Press. They make artists’ publications that take a variety of physical forms and utilize diverse printmaking techniques, and which make great teaching tools. (I have already shared these publications twice with students and will be presenting them to the PNCA Alumni Council in June!)

Next, I moderated a session for my group, the Public Policy Committee (PPC), entitled “Libraries Resist!” where librarians from across the country shared how their programming, students, and exhibitions participate in activism. The session was heavily attended and a lively discussion followed. I was proud to represent the PPC and moderate a session that challenges the way libraries, librarians, and institutions engage in resistance to threats to our professional values and ethics. Among other activities, the PPC “monitors governmental activities affecting art libraries and visual resources collections; drafts position statements on legislative issues consistent with ARLIS/NA’s interests for review and action by the Executive Board… and educates the membership on these issues.” You can find the PPC’s monthly News Alerts (of which I am the new editor) here: https://arlisna.org/news/public-policy-news-alerts I only ate one slice of pizza today, but it was really good.

Workshop of Robert Campin, Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), 1427-32, Oil on oak

Workshop of Robert Campin, Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), 1427-32, Oil on oak. The Cloisters Collection, 1956. Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

After an enriching and busy conference, I spent a personal day at the Met Cloisters, the arm of the Metropolitan Museum of Art that is “dedicated to the art, architecture, and gardens of medieval Europe,” and houses the famous Unicorn Tapestries and several illustrated manuscripts including the The Belles Heures of Jean de France, duc de Berry. I finally fulfilled a lifelong dream to spend a day with the treasures of the Cloisters, especially the Annunciation Triptych (Merode Altarpiece), by the workshop of Robert Campin. It is an exquisite example of early Netherlandish painting and I have spent years studying it; It was an unforgettable event to see it in person. Pizza slices eaten: 0, but I did eat many dumplings.

For more information about ACRL-OR’s professional development scholarship, contact us at acrlor@olaweb.org