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Upcoming Free Webinars

With the cancellation of the ACRL-OR/WA Joint Conference this year, ACRL-Oregon is organizing a series of free programming for the academic library community. Our first session, Big Little Learning: Lightning Talks and Poster Presentations, will take place next Friday, August 7th from 10-12 PST. There is a whole slate of presentations scheduled, including:

  • Small Scale IR for Community Colleges
  • #researchspeeddate: Think/Pair/Share for Online & Hybrid Courses
  • I bought a laptop: Connecting real-life experiences to Library research in First-Year Seminar
  • Changing Policies for Changing Times Team Science: A Question of Support for Undergraduate Research
  • Co-CREATE Your Class: Fostering Student Agency and Inquiry in Academic Literacies
  • Libros for Oregon – Collections Connect Communities

See below for full descriptions of the scheduled presentations.

Registration is open to any library staff person, but we are limited to 100 live attendees, so register soon!

REGISTER HERE: https://forms.gle/WufyatG8VuHKjeBY9

The session will be recorded and made available on our YouTube channel. If you register, we will email you a link to the recording after the event.

Questions about our webinars can be sent to Candise Branum, ACRL-Oregon President, at acrlor@olaweb.org.

PRESENTATION DETAILS:

  • Small Scale IR for Community Colleges

Presenter: Rowena McKernan (Whatcom Commuity College)
Abstract: We’ve recently built and deployed an Omeka-S institutional repository and want to share some insights into how to make this possible even for small and rural community colleges.

  • #researchspeeddate: Think/Pair/Share for Online & Hybrid Courses

Presenter: Chelsea Nesvig (UW Bothell/Cascadia College)
Abstract: Think/pair/share is an activity librarians and instructors regularly use in their teaching while students are present in a classroom. It offers opportunities for students to contemplate their answer to a question or prompt and discuss it with a classmate before sharing it with the whole classroom. Students benefit from sharing their thoughts and ideas with just one person before they are asked to share with the whole class. But what about in an online or hybrid classroom? Students are likely to complete research activities alone — without any interaction with their fellow classmates. By pairing students up to interact with each other in person, over the phone, or with a chat app, they are automatically able to talk to and engage with a classmate. In the early stages of the research process, students are often unsure about their topics and they regularly report that discussion with another student offers them peace of mind. Offering these students a way to engage with fellow classmates around their research helps break them out of the silos that online courses so often produce. The core structure of this activity can be applied to student interaction during different stages of the research process or even for non-research assignments.

  • I bought a laptop: Connecting real-life experiences to Library research in First-Year Seminar

Presenter: Lynda Irons (Pacific University)
Abstract: Curriculum changes in two separate-but-connected courses sparked an overhaul of how First-Year Seminar freshmen received library instruction. The librarian changed from a traditional information transfer approach to an active learning and discovery approach by connecting the dots between what they already knew and library research. Fall 2019 FYS students (re)discovered their autonomy in their decision-making strategies through three activities — all without the instructional librarian showing a single PowerPoint slide or even turning on a computer. The activities reinforced that the students knew substantially more than they thought they knew, and they didn’t even know they knew it. Ultimately, they realized that their prior knowledge and existing skills easily transferred to the academic library setting.

  • Changing Policies for Changing Times

Presenter: Drew Jackson (Pacific University); Sarah Kirkley (Pacific University); Laura Baird (Pacific University); Lynda Irons (Pacific University); Angela Lee (Pacific University)
Abstract: Policy writing is rarely nimble or innovative, but using change management techniques, Pacific University Libraries drafted policies to address the circumstances during this past year. We will discuss how we identified a need to change, which policies we changed, how we identified goals for change, and our methodology for working through changes. We will also share how we adapted our approach to accommodate remote work. We learned the importance of positioning policy within the University and legal framework; reframing the policies as part of an iterative, sustainable process; and involving a variety of perspectives. This process can be used not only for policies but also to build a responsive organization.

  • Team Science: A Question of Support for Undergraduate Research

Presenter: abby koehler (Western Washington University); Jenny Oleen (Western Washington University); Wyatt Heimbichner Goebel (Western Washington University)
Abstract: After recent strategic and structural changes within our organization, Western Libraries is experimenting with new team-based and collaborative approaches to improve the undergraduate research support we offer. Our newly formed subject support team — Team Science — along with the Western Libraries’ Tutoring Center and Hacherl Research & Writing Studio is now positioned to consider important questions regarding STEM students’ unique research needs. We are excited to share the groundwork we have laid in supporting undergraduate research contributions at Western Washington University.

  • Co-CREATE Your Class: Fostering Student Agency and Inquiry in Academic Literacies

Presenter: Caitlan Maxwell (Western Washington University Libraries); abby koehler (Western Washington University Libraries)
Abstract: Using an inquiry-based approach to a quarter-long linked credit course demands careful coordination among everyone involved. However, with innovative strategies like co-creating rubrics and assignments, using critical pedagogy focused on academic literacies, and implementing the CREATE (Consider, Read, Elucidate the hypotheses, Analyze and interpret the data, and Think of the next Experiment) method, it can be done. Join us for an overview of our team-teaching experience and a discussion of strengths-based, peer-to-peer learning approaches to information literacy that address student agency in writing, reading, research and more.

  • Libros for Oregon – Collections Connect Communities

Presenter: Hannah Bostrom (Salem Public Library); Deborah Gitlitz (Wilsonville Public Library); Valeria Davila (Oregon State University Libraries and Press); Alice Perez (Multnomah Law Library); Mark Peterson (Mt Hood Community College)
Abstract: Our poster session is about the Libros for Oregon (LfO) organization, which is a subset of Reforma Oregon. The project centers around bringing quality Spanish materials from the Guadalajara International Book Fair, the largest Spanish language book fair in the world, to Oregon libraries and their communities. To accomplish this task, LfO selects a cohort of libraries each year that selected representatives will buy items for. Travelers apply for the ALA Free Pass Program, which covers most of the traveling costs. All participating libraries chip in $200 to cover the rest of the travel costs, and allocate $500-$2,000 of their budget to this project. Books are selected by library professionals, with the help of Mexican vendors. Materials are shipped to the libraries and they promote the collection through programming and outreach events.

ACRL Oregon Professional Development Remote Scholarship Winners

The ACRL-OR  is pleased to announce the winners of the E-Learning Professional Development Scholarship.  The E-Learning Scholarship was created in response to conference cancellations due to Covid-19 and is designed to support remote learning opportunities for librarians.  Thanks to a matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-OR awarded 8 scholarships of up to $175 each to the following individuals

Congratulations to each of the winners. We look forward to learning more about your experiences.  

 

COVID-19 Mini-Grant Opportunity

The State Library Board has redirected approximately $100,000 of Oregon’s FFY2019 LSTA allotment from other LSTA projects and programs to be used for COVID-19 response mini-grants. Any legally established public, academic, school, or tribal library in Oregon, as well as special libraries with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status in Oregon may apply, and each library may choose which amount best suits their needs from the following: $500, $1,500 or $3,000 – your choice!

Applications will open on Monday, May 4, 2020, first to the following group of eligible entities:

  • Federally recognized tribes, K-12 schools, and special libraries
  • Legally established public libraries with permanent staffing levels up to 5 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees (as reported in the 2018-19 Oregon Public Library Statistical Report)
  • Academic libraries at institutions with student FTE enrollment of 1,000 or fewer (based on Fall 2018 enrollment data from the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission)

Applications will open for all other libraries on May 13, pending the level of interest we receive from the initial group, and will remain open until all funds have been awarded. The State Library of Oregon has set a goal that at least 40% of total funds awarded will go towards efforts supporting children, K-12 students, and youth services. Grants will otherwise be awarded on a rolling basis, limited to one grant per library/library system, school, or tribe.

For more information and instructions on how to apply, please visit our COVID-19 Response Grants page and find links to contact us with your questions.

Join ACRL-Oregon for a free webinar – “Makerspace Instruction & the ACRL Framework”

ACRL-Oregon offers free webinars on topics relevant to academic library staff. Our upcoming webinar is “Makerspace Instruction & the ACRL Framework” and will be presented by Amy Vecchione at Boise State University and Stephanie Milne-Lane from Willamette University on 5/27/2020, at 10am PST.

In this presentation Amy Vecchione and Stephanie Milne-Lane will host a discussion about research and instruction in a makerspace setting. They will outline the process of how the maker instruction program developed iteratively at Boise State University (BSU). Additionally, they will share the final results of Stephanie’s University of Washington MLIS capstone project, the BSU MakerLab Toolkit. They will also report on their conclusions regarding how the ACRL Framework is the best lens for developing maker instruction.

Registration is open to any library staff-person, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon!

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available on our YouTube channel. If you register, we will email you a link to the recording after the session. Questions about our webinars can be directed to ACRL-Oregon President Candise Branum.

Deadline Extended: ACRL-OR Board Nominations

Interested in meeting other fantastic academic librarians and serving the academic library community in Oregon? Is there someone you know that would be a shining addition to the ACRL-OR Board? Here is an opportunity to get involved! The ACRL-OR Board is looking for candidates to run in our upcoming spring elections.

The open positions are:

  • 1 Vice-President/President Elect (3 year term)
  • 2 Members-at-Large (2 year term)

View position descriptions and responsibilities for more information.

How to nominate:

To nominate yourself, a colleague, or an employee, submit our online nomination form. The nomination period has been extended and will close on Tuesday, May 5, 2020.

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and ACRL national
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

Questions?

Please contact Michele Burke (michele.burke@chemeketa.edu) if you have any questions or concerns about the open positions.

Thank you,

The ACRL-OR Nominating Committee

Rachel Bridgewater, Vice President – President Elect
Patrick Wohlmut
Michele Burke

E-Learning Professional Development Scholarship

ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a unique round of Professional Development Scholarship awards aimed to support E-Learning opportunities.   Thanks to a matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer multiple awards of up to $175. The E-Learning Professional Development Scholarship applications are open and we are currently soliciting applications for the April 24th deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward remote conferences, remote workshops, E-Learning courses, E-Learning seminars, or other learning opportunities appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration costs incurred by the applicant. 

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) annual conference as a director representing the Association of Independent Colleges of Art
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • In awarding scholarships, preference will be given to:
    • Applicants from diverse cultural/ethnic backgrounds and/or historically marginalized groups
    • Applicants employed at institutions or in positions serving under-represented groups
    • Applicants who have not previously been awarded an ACRL-OR scholarship
    • Applicants employed at community or technical colleges or applicants employed at smaller or rural institutions with limited funding

Who is not eligible?

  • Non ACRL-Oregon members.
  • Individuals who have already been awarded an ACRL-OR scholarship in the current fiscal year

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:  Friday, April 24 2020

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Candise Branum
ACRL-OR President, 2019-2020
acrlor@olaweb.org

Updated: ACRL Board Call for Nominations

Please find our updated call below and consider nominating yourself or someone else for the Board!

Interested in meeting other fantastic academic librarians and serving the academic library community in Oregon? Is there someone you know that would be a shining addition to the ACRL-OR Board? Here is an opportunity to get involved! The ACRL-OR Board is looking for candidates to run in our upcoming spring elections. 

The open positions are:

  • 1 Vice-President/President Elect (3 year term)
  • 2 Members-at-Large (2 year term)

View position descriptions and responsibilities for more information.

How to nominate: 

To nominate yourself, a colleague, or an employee, submit our online nomination form. The nomination period will close on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. 

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and ACRL national
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

Questions?

Please contact Michele Burke (michele.burke@chemeketa.edu) if you have any questions or concerns about the open positions.

Thank you,

The ACRL-OR Nominating Committee

Rachel Bridgewater, Vice President – President Elect
Patrick Wohlmut
Michele Burke

Statement of support for ALA Executive Board recommendation to close libraries to the public, March 17, 2020

The American Library Association issued a statement on March 17, 2020 recommending that academic leaders close libraries to the public to protect library workers, students, faculty, and staff from exposure to COVID-19.  ACRL-Oregon supports the ALA recommendation and encourages academic libraries to act immediately for the health and safety of library workers and the communities they serve. Staying open increases exposure for library employees, the larger community, and our most vulnerable students. 

Academic libraries are, by design, unsuited to support the social distancing recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health authorities. Keeping large public spaces like academic libraries open creates a false sense of security in direct opposition to efforts to decrease transmission of COVID-19. The strategy of having students without computer or Internet access use the Library during the pandemic also puts our most vulnerable community members at the greatest risk of infection.

Online access, virtual services, and remote collaboration are standard characteristics of academic library culture that can be employed immediately to move work online and offset library closures. 

While specific plans and resources differ between libraries, ACRL-OR encourages all academic libraries to ensure that library workers are fully compensated, with health coverage, while libraries are closed.

We are experiencing an unprecedented time of uncertainty and academic libraries must take the initiative to respond early and do their part to minimize community spread of COVID-19 and protect our number one resource: library workers. 

We urge you to close all academic libraries as soon as possible. 

Signed,

The ACRL-Oregon Board
http://acrloregon.org 

Candise Branum, ACRL-OR President, Oregon College of Oriental Medicine
Meredith Farkas, ACRL-OR Past-President, Portland Community College
Rachel Bridgewater, ACRL-OR Vice-President, Portland Community College
Aja Bettencourt-McCarthy, Oregon Institute of Technology
Ann Matsushima Chiu, Reed College
Heidi E. K. Senior, University of Portland
Katherine S. Donaldson, University of Oregon
Michele Burke, Chemeketa Community College
Patrick Wohlmut, Linfield College

ACRL-OR Board: Call for nominations

Interested in meeting other fantastic academic librarians and serving the academic library community in Oregon? Is there someone you know that would be a shining addition to the ACRL-OR Board? Here is an opportunity to get involved! The ACRL-OR Board is looking for candidates to run in our upcoming spring elections. 

The open positions are:

  • 1 Vice-President/President Elect (3 year term)
  • 2 Members-at-Large (2 year term)

View position descriptions and responsibilities for more information.

How to nominate:

To nominate yourself, a colleague, or an employee, submit our online nomination form. The nomination period will close on Tuesday, April 21, 2020. 

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and ACRL national
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

Questions?

Please contact Michele Burke (michele.burke@chemeketa.edu) if you have any questions or concerns about the open positions.

Thank you,

The ACRL-OR Nominating Committee

Rachel Bridgewater
Patrick Wohlmut
Michele Burke

 

COVID-19 and Academic Libraries

The following is a letter from Candise Branum, ACRL-Oregon President

As many of you may already know, the World Health Organization has publicly classified COVID-19 as a pandemic. Across the country, K-12 schools are shuttering, colleges and universities are moving curriculum online, music festivals, conferences, and sporting events are cancelled or are proceeding without fans. When the NBA cancels the rest of the season, you know things are serious. So much has happened in the past few days that I don’t even know how to process it all.

One thing that has come up for me, though, is thinking about the academic library’s role in continuing education throughout a pandemic. As universities cancel in-person classes and move towards providing online education, libraries continue to remain open to provide services to suddenly displaced students. Some academic libraries are business as usual, while others are operating at reduced hours. There are a select few who are closing facilities altogether but are promoting online library services, like MIT. 

I was speaking with another library director at a smaller college recently about the decision to remain open or to close in the event that our respective organizations move curriculum online. We are both adamant about protecting our library staff, and she mentioned allowing her employees to work from home and staffing the library at reduced hours by herself. My first thought was, yes, this is absolutely something that I would do as well. And something that I have done. As a library director, sometimes you have to work an extra long day or otherwise pick up the slack; that is completely understandable. But then I started to question why I tend to not prioritize my own physical and mental health, and why administrations are not prioritizing the safety of library staff when making decisions to close facilities. 

So why do so many colleges come to the conclusion that being on campus and in a classroom is a risk, but justify keeping the library open? It almost feels like the burden has recklessly been displaced onto library staff. Moving curriculum online and leaving libraries to support those changes also makes the assumption that library staff are not high-risk themselves, or that they do not live with immunocompromised or elderly people. And what is the actual goal in keeping the library open? Is it primarily about access to the facilities? Because I think we could all be pretty creative in how we provide access to other library services, including reference, document delivery, and even book delivery. 

Why is it so hard to close a library? There is an assumption that libraries will continue to remain open, and of course we don’t want to disappoint our communities, but we’ve also been programmed to believe that it is our responsibility to lay our bodies on the line in order to remain open. Yes, I absolutely signed on to provide library services and to be a leader in difficult times. I am still here and committed to that. But I also pause to remind myself that Librarianship is a primarily female-identified profession, and that as academic librarians, we are seen as both educators and caretakers, and in the time of a crisis, martyrs. I question the extent to which we are expected to put our bodies on the line during this public health crisis. Public librarians (shout out!) are physically and mentally challenged every day, but I also think: where is the line? When do we value our own safety? I don’t have an answer to this except to say that this is the conflict I’m currently struggling with — valuing the health and safety of our library staff, and balancing that with our commitment to serving our communities through dangerous times. And understanding that there can be an intrinsic conflict in being both a caretaker and in taking care of yourself.

In times of crisis, libraries have the potential to be places of sanctuary. Sometimes a library provides computing services that allow students to continue their education online when they do not have the technology, space, or quiet that is required to do this from home (and this is all assuming that they have a safe home). Sometimes a library’s value can be as simple as providing a safe, warm space for people to rest. But there is no road map for how academic libraries handle a pandemic. Oregon colleges and universities have yet to close down their campuses, but as administrations prepare for what seems to be the inevitable, I encourage everyone working in academic libraries to take a moment to think about your own values and boundaries. Think about how to balance the desire to support our students, but also make the right choice for yourself and your family when it comes to staffing your library during a healthcare crisis.

And continue to take care of yourself and one another.

Candise Branum
ACRL-Oregon President, 2019-2020