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Registration is now open for the Spring Information Literacy Summit!

Join the Information Literacy Advisory Group of Oregon (ILAGO) on Saturday May 13 at WSU Vancouver for a stimulating day of Information Literacy discussion!

ILAGO Header Image

Registration is $30 and includes continental breakfast and lunch.

Register and find more details on the ILAGO website: https://ilago.wordpress.com/oregon-il-summit-2017/

For those interested in Open Education Resources, the Summit will be preceded by the Library as Open Education Spring Workshop on Friday May 12 at the Vancouver Community Library. Details available here: https://libraryasleader.org/loel-workshop-may-12-2017/

For more information about the Spring Information Literacy Summit, contact Sarah Ralston, ILAGO Chair 2016-2017, at sralston@eou.edu

 

Interview with Steve Silver, Northwest Christian University

Photo of Steve Silver

Steve Silver, Director, Kellenberger Library at Northwest Christian University

 

Tell us a little bit about your work background.

Like many, librarianship is a second career for me. I have a Masters in Choral Conducting (University of Oregon) and did church music gigs in Oregon and Washington for many years. Twenty years ago I took a second job working part time as the technical services assistant in the library at what was then Northwest Christian College (now University, also my alma mater). At the time it was just a job to supplement income. Through a series of fortuitous circumstances I was able to earn my MLS, moved to technical services librarian, and ten years ago became library director.

What has been the best thing that has happened to you since you started your position?

In the fall of 2011 I was awarded a grant from ALA to host their traveling exhibit Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible in the NCU library. This exhibit, jointly sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare library in Washington, D.C, with assistance from the Bodleian Library, Oxford, England., celebrated the 400 year anniversary of the King James Bible. The exhibit explored both the creation of the King James Bible and its impact on culture, language, and literature. NCU was one of only two libraries in Oregon to host this exhibit and one of only a couple dozen or so around the country. It was a huge undertaking for our very small institution but proved to be a phenomenal success, drawing hundreds of visitors to our campus and providing opportunities to collaborate and strengthen bonds with other community organizations.

Tied for best experience, and closely related, was my summer 2011 sabbatical. NCU is fortunate to own one of the most extensive collections of rare early printed English language Bibles in the western United States. 2011 also marked the 100 year anniversary of the founding of this collection. I was able to use my sabbatical to research this founding, including a trip to England to visit still existing book shops where some of the Bibles were purchased, as well as visit sites in Oxford where NCU‘s founding president Eugene Sanderson worked and studied himself. Visiting the old Bodleian Library while there was one of many highlights.

 What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about you?

As you might surmise from my answer above, I’m rather passionate about the history of the Bible as a book, particularly the early years of its translation into English. I love sharing this history and exhibiting NCU‘s incredible rare Bibles. I welcome inquiries and opportunities to do so (seriously; call me).

I’m also passionate about intellectual freedom issues, which may not be so surprising for a librarian but perhaps cuts against the stereotype of someone from a faith-based institution. I am currently working on a book chapter on intellectual freedom from a Christian perspective.

On a more personal note, I’m a huge Oregon Ducks Football fan. Fantasy is probably my favorite genre for reading, though I also read scifi, some bestsellers along the mystery/thriller line, and of course books on the history of the Bible. I enjoy a wide variety of music (but not country. Or rap. And probably not polkas). Our daughter is getting married this October, so we’re slowly ramping up wedding planning mode (they’ve sure gotten expense since we got married 30 years ago).

What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

Probably staffing. NCU‘s enrollment has been growing in recent years, which is great. But over the past decade or so the library’s staffing levels have actually decreased. So we’re serving more students with fewer professional and student staff. Coupled with trying to adequately serve our several distinct student populations with a very small staff we’re stretched quite thin (we have traditional daytime undergrads, evening degree completion and masters programs on accelerated 8-week semesters, and online courses and programs).

What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

We are small but growing. Currently around 800 students. Although NCU is un-apologetically Christian, we are fairly ecumenical, welcoming students and faculty from a wide-variety of Christian faith experiences. Students do not need to be specifically Christian. In fact we had a student body president come out as atheist during his term a few years ago. That attracted a bit of attention, but he was allowed to continue his term and graduated. All faculty must have a statement of faith describing their particular Christian faith journey, but NCU does not proscribe any specific faith statement, unlike most other faith-based institutions.

And did I mention we have an amazing collection of rare early printed English Bibles?

What does advocacy for academic libraries look like from your perspective as a library director?

1) Do our jobs well. Proving our worth by actually being of worth may be the most overlooked aspect of effective advocacy. 2) Relationships. Establishing positive, trust-filled relationships with administrators, one’s supervisor, leaders of other campus units, and significant friends of the university provides opportunities for the advocacy message to be heard. If they know I care for them as individuals, that I care about what they care about, and that I am trustworthy, fair, and honest, they are much more likely to hear my message when I advocate for library needs. 3) Put the institution first. An academic library exists to support the institution. Putting library needs first creates division and competition and undermines trust. Re-framing library needs as ways to support the institution creates collaboration and trust, and keeps my work in perspective.

This is all internal advocacy. Especially in today’s environment external advocacy is at least as important. Others are more informed about best practices in this realm, and I strive to follow their lead. Such efforts are vitally important. I am intentionally working to improve the level and competence of my efforts to advocate for libraries on state and national levels, and challenge each one of us to do so as well.

Steve Silver signature

Call for Proposals – OASL

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The planning committee for the 2017 OASL Fall Conference is hard at work putting together a conference that will benefit a broad spectrum of attendees. That means they need great sessions, so they are calling for ideas and proposals.

Conference Dates: Friday-Saturday, Oct. 13-14, 2017
Conference Location: Jesuit High School (Portland)
Conference Theme: Future Ready. Set. Launch!

The Saturday sessions will be each be an hour long. Sessions on a broad range of topics are encouraged.

Please fill out this proposal form by April 21 if you:
1.      Want to present at the fall conference, or
2.      Have an idea for a session

For questions, please contact:

Chris Myers,Saturday Sessions Chair, 2017 OASL Fall Conference
Email: oaslsaturdaysessions@gmail.com ~ Cell/text: 503-481-2507

*Deadline Next Week, 3/31* Win Up to $250 with the ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship!

The submission deadline is fast approaching for the next round of the 2016-2017 ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship! Submit your application by Friday, March 31st, 2017! You might win up to $250.

The ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarships may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (check out previous scholarship winners). All ACRL-Oregon members may apply. Please visit our scholarship page as well as our FAQ, which contains more information on the evaluation process. To apply, use the online form. Not an ACRL-OR member? Consider joining to take advantage of this opportunity: https://acrloregon.org/join/ten-reasons-to-become-a-member/

Questions? Contact the ACRL-OR Board President:
Stephanie Debner
ACRL-OR President, 2016-2017
stephanie.debner@mhcc.edu
Mt. Hood Community College

Application for 2017-2018 Education Advisory Committee Now Open

The Digital Public Library of America is looking for excellent instructors in higher education to join its Education Advisory Committee for 2017-2018. DPLA recently announced a new grant from the Teagle Foundation that funds the creation of a professional development curriculum and new set development for a Primary Source Sets project.

DPLA is currently recruiting a small group of enthusiastic educators in higher education to collaborate with its current team of K-12 and higher ed instructors on this project. Specifically, they are interested in applicants working in humanities fields with US culture including English, Composition, History, Area Studies, Music, Art History, and education fields including Secondary Education, School Librarianship, and Curriculum and Instruction. Applicants can be employed in various roles in higher education including administration or as professors, lecturers, instructors, or adjuncts. Members of this group will:

  • Develop and deliver curriculum for professional development using DPLA and its resources for inquiry-based instruction
  • Collaborate with K-12 and higher ed members of the Education Advisory Committee to develop best practices for implementing the Primary Source Sets
  • Write new primary source sets following DPLA’s format and participate in peer review and revision (3 in 15 months)
  • Provide input on online professional development modules

If selected, participants are committing to:

  • Attend a 2-day in-person meeting on June 29-30, 2017 (arriving the night of June 28 if traveling from far away) in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Attend six virtual meetings approximately quarterly (September 2017 – November 2018)
  • Participate in no more than one professional development or conference presentation as scheduled

Participants will receive a $1,200 stipend (upon completion of the project in Dec 2018) for participation as well as full reimbursement for travel costs. The deadline for applications for the 2017-2018 Education Advisory Committee is March 31, 2017.

To learn more about DPLA’s work with education, read their Education page. For questions, please contact education@dp.la.

Reflections on Reflections

During the closing hours of the 2016 ACRL Oregon & Washington Joint Fall Conference, participants were asked to reflect on their conference experience and write a “note to self”: someone to follow up with; a reminder to launch a project; a goal they were inspired to work toward; or anything else they wanted to remember about the conference. The notes were sealed and self-addressed that morning. The conference chair mailed the notes to participants eight weeks later in the first days of January 2017.

The conference planning committee (aka the ACRL Oregon Board) wondered what conference goers’ reactions would be when they opened those envelopes. One participant agreed to let us peer into her reflections on reflections. Thank you, Rachel!

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“Are you reflecting?  Professionally, privately.  Don’t let the days run into each other.”

Photo of ACRL OR Conference follow-up letters

Early in the new year, my own hasty scrawl arrived at my door from the past to admonish me (gently) to take some time to think. I’d attended the ACRL OR/WA Joint Conference (aka Menucha) and we were given the opportunity to write ourselves a note, which would be delivered in a few months. By the time my note arrived, I’d more or less forgotten I’d done it. It turns out, I’d also more or less forgotten to do most of what was on it, too. The days, as I’d suspected, had run into each other.

The problem of maintaining the excitement and inspiration we have when we are at a conference once we return to our busy libraries is familiar and, probably, somewhat inevitable.  However, I’ve always felt it most acutely with the Menucha conferences. Fall term is the busiest time of the year for most of us and retreating to this beautiful spot to talk about big ideas with colleagues is a welcome break from the rush of October. We spend 24 hours just feasting on each others’ beautiful ideas and then head right back into the press of fall term.

When the letter arrived at my house, that lovely misty October day in the Gorge felt really far away. Winter term was just beginning and it was the perfect time to get a reminder about everything that had excited me and all the insights I’d had at the end of the conference. As much as any of the specific thoughts I’d written, the little dose of that post-conference mindset delivered to me at a time when I could really use it felt like magic. While my note had some concrete “to do” items on it (most of which I still haven’t done, oops!), what struck me most was how much the overall message to myself was that I ought to be finding more time for that “Menucha State of Mind” in my day-to-day work life. I encouraged myself to reflect. I reminded myself of the inspiration and meaning I draw from my relationships with colleagues (and not just those at my own institution). I have the note tacked up on my bulletin board now, and while I may or may not ever tackle those big projects I was thinking about last fall, I can look at it and remember what it was like to take the time to reflect with colleagues and, maybe, not let the days run into each other quite so much.

Rachel Bridgewater

PCC Cascade Library

Win Up to $250 with the ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship!

Round Two of the 2016-2017 ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship is open! Submit your application by Friday, March 31st, 2017!

The ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarships may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (check out previous scholarship winners). All ACRL-Oregon members may apply. Please visit our scholarship page as well as our FAQ, which contains more information on the evaluation process. To apply, use the online form.

Questions? Contact the ACRL-OR Board President:
Stephanie Debner
ACRL-OR President, 2016-2017
stephanie.debner@mhcc.edu
Mt. Hood Community College

Join ACRL-OR!

Attention ACRL Oregon Members:
Looking for an opportunity to get more involved with an active professional organization and to work with a great group of people? Run for a position in ACRL-OR’s upcoming spring election.

The open positions are:

To nominate yourself please fill out this form that includes the following information:

  • Your name.
  • Your present position–list your title, the name of the library and college or university and the dates of employment.
  • Previous positions, if desired–list no more than two, the most recent first.
  • Your education–list institutions attended, degrees conferred, and dates awarded.
  • Professional activities, such as memberships and positions held in national, state and/or regional library organizations (indicate name of organization, offices held and dates of service).
  • Honors, special projects, publications, and/or presentations–list no more than two recent examples of each of these.
  • Candidates for Vice President/President Elect also need to include a Candidates’ Statement explaining why you would like to be elected, which should be no more than 200 words

Eligibility:

  • Vice-President/President Elect candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon and national ACRL
  • Member-at-Large candidates must be members of OLA and ACRL-Oregon

To nominate someone else, email that person’s name and contact information to Steve Silver (ssilver@nwcu.edu) or Molly Gunderson (mgun2@pdx.edu)

 

A Renaissance for the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection

The OSU Libraries’ Library Faculty Association invites colleagues and friends to the February 2017 Seminar Series Presentation: A Renaissance for the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection, with Dr. Brian Lee Sidlauskas, Associate Professor in OSU’s Department of Fisheries & Wildlife and Curator of the Ichthyology Collection. The seminar will be on February 24th from 10:00am-11:30am.

The Oregon State Ichthyology Collection (OSIC), which contains approximately a quarter million preserved fish specimens, has been a major center of research and education on the biology of fishes since its establishment in 1935.  Despite continued scientific use, the OSIC’s physical facilities declined in the late 20th century due to a lack of space for growth and insufficient funding.  Simultaneously, a lack of computerization discouraged researchers elsewhere from accessing its specimens.  Curator Brian Sidlauskas will discuss how we restored the scientific and educational value of the OSIC, and highlight recent science using the collection.  One component of the restoration upgraded the collections’ physical facilities by installing mobile compact shelving in a renovated space that now meets modern fire and earthquake safety codes. We also upgraded the collection’s digital presence by modernizing the collection’s catalog of specimens and making the holdings searchable online at ichthyology.oregonstate.edu. Through the completion of this project, one of the most important libraries of ichthyological diversity on the west coast of the US is again stable, safe, properly curated, and accessible to the world’s community of scientists. It regularly accessions new specimens, loans material to researchers at other institutions, hosts researchers from around the world, and supports research and teaching on taxonomy, genetics, biogeography, parasitology, evolution, ecology and conservation biology.

Brian Lee Sidlauskas is an associate professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University.  The son of a fisherman and an art teacher, he grew up along the coast of historic Salem, Massachusetts.  As an ichthyologist, Dr. Sidlauskas works to help reveal and protect the world’s tremendous biodiversity of fishes.  He teaches courses dealing with ichthyology, systematics, biodiversity and conservation biology, and his research seeks to understand the evolution, ecology and diversity of freshwater fishes on scales ranging from local to global. He achieved a measure of internet fame for his use of Facebook to community source fish identifications from photographs. Dr. Sidlauskas has involved nearly two dozen undergraduates in the research and management of the quarter-million preserved fishes in the Oregon State Ichthyology Collection, which he curates.  In 2014 he was named OSU’s Undergraduate Mentor of the Year.

The seminar will take place in the Autzen classroom on the main (2nd) floor of the Valley Library (Valley 2082). Light refreshments will be provided. Please contact Beth.Filar-Williams@oregonstate.edu or Uta.Hussong-Christian@oregonstate.edu with any questions. Library visitor info (including campus map and parking info can be found online: http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/visit)

Can We Do That? Intellectual Property Rights and Visual Media

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) is pleased to announce that Can We Do That?: Intellectual Property Rights and Visual Media, will be held  on Thursday, March 30, 2017 at Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA). This workshop will be co-hosted by the PNCA and the University of Oregon Libraries, and is open to cultural heritage professionals, the information and educational communities, and to anyone interested in visual culture. Can We Do That? is one of four workshops being offered in the second year of the VRAF Regional Workshop Program.  The VRAF is grateful to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for their continued support of this exciting opportunity to partner with cultural heritage and educational institutions.

A thorough understanding of intellectual property rights can be a challenge for lawyers, let alone for information, academic, and cultural heritage professionals, and the application of copyright restrictions on visual media can induce a sense of alarm and uncertainty dependent upon specific circumstances. This workshop will provide a clear focus on U.S. copyright law, intellectual property rights, and fair use as they pertain to the use of visual media (e.g., images and moving images) within the academic, archival, library, gallery, and museum environments.  Educational usage, securing publication rights, creative reuse, rights statements, licensing, and the public domain will be explored within the context of case studies, including those provided by participants in advance of the workshop.  Participants will also be introduced to tools and resources to help them and their constituents in making appropriate decisions regarding appropriate use and dissemination of visual media.

Can We Do That? will be taught by Cara Hirsch, Associate General Counsel at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, which owns and operates the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, as well as the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. Cara supports the Guggenheim’s legal affairs in a wide variety of areas including intellectual property. Prior to the Guggenheim, Cara was Deputy General Counsel for Artstor, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning in the arts, humanities and other fields. Among her duties at Artstor, Cara collaborated in refining Artstor’s intellectual property and other legal strategies for the organization. She also supervised the rights review and clearance process for media collections in the Artstor Digital Library, a digital image resource that makes available to nonprofit institutions over 1.7 million digital images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences. Prior to her work at Artstor, Cara worked as an Associate at the law firms of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP and Andrews Kurth LLP, where she practiced in the field of intellectual property.  She served as Co-Chair of the Intellectual Property Rights Committee of the Visual Resources Association from 2011-2014. Cara received her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law and her B.A., with distinction, from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Registration for Can We Do That? is now open. The fee for this day-long workshop is $125. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/j4slq32. If you have questions about registration, feel free to contact Betha Whitlow, VRAF Director, bwhitlow@wustl.edu. For questions about the Pacific Northwest College of Art venue, please contact Serenity Ibsen, Interim Director of Library Services at PNCA, sibsen@pnca.edu.

For those who also plan to attend Online Northwest on Friday, March 31, this represents a unique opportunity to make a long weekend packed with high-level programming!