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Collaborating for a Bird Safe Campus

By the Mt. Hood Community College Bird Safety Action Team

Photo of MHCC's Bird Safety Action Team

MHCC’s Bird Safety Action Team. From left to right: Troy Builta, Building Information Specialist, Facilities Management; Susan J. Spencer, Instructor – Anatomy & Physiology, Science; Mark Peterson, Faculty Librarian; Walter Shriner, Instructor – Biology, Science; Heather White, Library Technical Services and OER Coordinator

Having read the recent article “Decline of the North American Avifauna”¹ which explores and documents the alarming loss of migratory birds over the last 40 years (the U.S. and Canada have lost nearly 3 billion birds, a massive reduction in abundance involving hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants), Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) Library Technical Services and OER Coordinator Heather White decided to take action.

She has organized the Bird Safety Action Team, which operates under the oversight of the campus Infrastructure Council. This team is composed of herself as well as Library, Biology, and Anatomy & Physiology faculty, which is working with various relevant campus stakeholders and governing bodies in order to make the entire campus a safer environment for both the birds that call our campus home, and for those that visit during their annual migrations.

The team’s short term goals are to raise awareness and gather data from our campus community so we can have anti-collision bird-proofing on highest risk windows by February 2020, in time for the spring migration season. Long term goals include getting the entire campus certified as Bird Safe, Bee Safe, Tree Safe, and maybe certified by the Audubon Society as a “Backyard Wildlife Habitat” through their Institutional program.

In 2016, MHCC became the first Salmon-Safe certified community college in the country.

As this initiative continues, the action team will be working with faculty and students from a variety of programs, including Biology and Integrated Media, in order to implement bird safety solutions such as professional grade anti-collision window treatments, hosting nature-scaping workshops for the east county community, and habitat restoration projects across campus.

As the site of two Sandy River tributaries (Beaver and Kelly creeks), Mt. Hood Community College’s 212-acre Gresham Campus serves an integral role in the encompassing 500-square-mile Sandy River basin. The campus has more than 40 acres of forested lands, as well as wetlands, a 1.62 acre pond, and is home to several endangered species as well as large numbers of migratory birds and waterfowl. The unique nature of our campus provides the Bird Safety Action Team with an opportunity to have a significant impact on east county bird populations through local campus efforts.

This project is a wonderful example of how applied information literacy skills, along with the cross-pollination of skill sets and areas of expertise from a variety of discipline areas, can be utilized to great positive effect on campus and in the local community.

More information about this project can be found at the following libguide: https://libguides.mhcc.edu/birds

¹Rosenberg, Kenneth V, Adriaan M. Dokter, Peter J. Blancher, John R. Sauer, Adam C. Smith, Paul A. Smith, Jessica C. Stanton, Arvind Panjabi, Laura Helft, Michael Parr, and Peter P. Marra. “Decline of the North American Avifauna.” Science. 366.6461 (2019): 120-124. Print.

 

Professional Development Scholarship: Apply Now for Spring

ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a new round of Professional Development Scholarship awards.   Thanks to a matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $675  for each award for the 2019-2020 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the March 27th deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant. 

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) annual conference as a director representing the Association of Independent Colleges of Art
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright


Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • In awarding scholarships, preference will be given to:
    • Applicants from diverse cultural/ethnic backgrounds and/or historically marginalized groups
    • Applicants employed at institutions or in positions serving under-represented groups
    • Applicants who have not previously been awarded an ACRL-OR scholarship
    • Applicants employed at community or technical colleges or applicants employed at smaller or rural institutions with limited funding

Who is not eligible?

  • Non ACRL-Oregon members.
  • Individuals who have already been awarded an ACRL-OR scholarship in the current fiscal year

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2019-2020 year:

  • November 29, 2019
  • March 27, 2020
  • July 31, 2020

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Candice Branum
ACRL-OR President, 2019-2020
acrlor@olaweb.org

Join ACRL-Oregon for a free webinar – “Improving Library Tutorials: The Multimedia Design Principles”

ACRL-Oregon offers free webinars on topics relevant to academic library staff. Our upcoming webinar is “Improving Library Tutorials: The Multimedia Design Principles” and will be presented by Darlene Aguilar, Instructional Design Librarian at Loyola Marymount University, on Wednesday, March 18th, 2020, at 10:00 a.m. Pacific.

Are you creating online modules, videos, or tutorials to teach information literacy skills?

Whether designing instruction online or in-person, you must implement research-based instructional methods for successful learning to occur, and Mayer’s Multimedia Design Principles are the best place to start. In this session, you will better understand the relationship between memory and learning to differentiate between effective and ineffective multimedia with the guidance of 12 principles: multimedia, spatial contiguity, temporal contiguity, coherence, modality, redundancy, individual differences, signaling, pacing, concepts first, personalization, and human voice.

Join us for this live webinar to ensure your questions get answered and you are able to apply these principles in your own tutorials.

Registration is open to any library staff-person, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon! 

https://forms.gle/GP1djZqJ11YCDNFD6

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available on our YouTube channel. If you register, we will email you a link to the recording after the session. Questions about our webinars can be directed to ACRL-Oregon President Candise Branum at acrlor@olaweb.org

 

New Undergraduate Research & Writing Studio Opens at Concordia University

The Concordia University Libraries recently opened a new Undergraduate Research and Writing Studio. The new space is located on the first floor of the George R. White Library & Learning Center and will operate by a studio-based learning model, meaning that students can drop in to work on their papers at their own pace with the help of peer tutors. The Studio will still offer some 45-minute appointment sessions as well as online help for distance students. Faculty are also encouraged to reserve the space for their classes.

Photo of Research & Writing Center Ribbon Cutting

At a grand opening event on January 22nd, student tutors, faculty, and staff were on hand to celebrate the new space. Interim President Tom Ries was in attendance, where he remarked on the importance of Concordia University supporting student writing.

Acting Dean of Libraries Nancy Hoover also gave remarks at the event, stating that the reorganization of Concordia’s college structure, which resulted in moving the Writing Center into the library, “created a wonderful opportunity, not only for the co-location of the vital student resources of Research and Writing, but also the formation of a deep collaboration of student focused support.” She also emphasized how the new Studio will “provide strong support for student choice, access, and success” as well as provide opportunities for the Writing Center to collaborate with librarians. Krista Reynolds, Head of Reference & Instruction, also emphasized the opportunities for collaboration. “I’m excited the librarians have the opportunity to join forces with writing services to serve students even more seamlessly and effectively than ever,” she said.

The Studio is meant to be an active learning space. “Studio pedagogy is a different framework for the process of how students learn to be better writers. It engages the process of research as well as the process of generating ideas, drafting, and revision,” Meg Roland, Undergraduate Writing Chair and Director of the Research and Writing Studio shared. “The Reference librarians are here to support the mutually informed process of researching, reading, evaluating, synthesizing, and drafting.” Roland says that the learning model for the Studio will incorporate practices found at other Northwest universities like Oregon State and Western Washington that have a studio-based learning model to support research and writing.

Join ACRL-Oregon for a free webinar – What is quantitative data good for?

ACRL-Oregon offers free webinars on topics relevant to academic library staff. Our upcoming webinar is “What is quantitative data good for? Throwing great big noisy fusses about white colonial power structures.  *An ode to Ramona Quimby” and will be presented by M. Brooke Robertshaw, PhD, Assistant Professor and Assessment Librarian at Oregon State University on Thursday, January 30th, 2020, at 10am Pacific.

If you don’t know Ramona Quimby, through this presentation you will learn a bit more about her.  If you do know her, you know she is  all about justice and fairness, but sometimes context needs to be changed so we can get to that space of justice. Thus, this webinar will discuss how, as a society, we got to a space where we are using quantitative methods as a tool of oppression, how we can rethink these uses, and ways to think about research as activism. Data, like Ramona’s rain boots, should be shown off, but it’s much prettier when we can rinse off some of the muck of white patriarchal colonialism.

Registration is open to any library staff-person, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon!

https://forms.gle/rpZwQ8PMs3wZeYMX6

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available on our YouTube channel. If you register, we will email you a link to the recording after the session.

 

Congratulations to Professional Development Scholarship Winners!

ACRL-OR is delighted to announce the awarding of a professional development scholarship to Steve Silver, the Library Director at Northwest Christian University.  Mr. Silver will be attending the 2020 OLA Annual Conference in Bend, Oregon.  He will be representing private colleges at a session sponsored by the Intellectual Freedom Committee on diversity and inclusion and sharing his experiences working at a private, Christian liberal arts college.

Photo of Steve Silver

Steve Silver, Director, Kellenberger Library at Northwest Christian University

Congratulations to Steve Silver on receiving this scholarship.  We wish Mr. Silver safe travels to Bend and look forward to hearing about his experiences following the conference in May.

Re-cap: University of Portland Library’s Digital Privacy Checkup

University of Portland (UP) librarians Jane Scott, Heidi Senior, and Diane Sotak, along with two library student workers, offered a Digital Privacy Checkup pop-up event on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, that we thought other ACRL-OR members would like to know about. We were inspired by similar events (Sullivan et al., 2018) elsewhere that have been successful.

Photo of UP Digital Privacy Chceckup

Digital Privacy Checkup pop-up event in the University of Porland Library lobby

Heeding research related to attendance at traditional library workshops (Witherspoon & Taber, 2018) recommending that librarians “be there,” (i.e., be where the students are) we set up in the library’s lobby rather than holding a drop-in workshop, and we were “pushy” (Witherspoon & Taber, p. 12), approaching students as they entered the building to ask if they “wanted to learn a little bit about digital privacy.”

The event had two main themes “Creating Strong Passwords” and “Your Digital Footprint (Understanding What the Internet Knows About You).” These themes correspond to pages of resources on a Digital Privacy Checkup LibGuide we created for the event. We set up four laptops on tables in the lobby so that students could explore the LibGuide’s sites, with a spinner provided by the UP Student Activities office as a fun way to select a site at random. We offered a diceware game (Reinhold, 2019) to illustrate the passphrase approach to creating strong passwords. We also set up two whiteboards asking students to share their concerns about digital privacy, and to fill in the blank: “I am concerned about sharing ____ on the Internet.”

In addition to these activities, we gave out freebies: zine-style instruction booklets about creating a strong password (McElroy, 2018); “#cyberaware” pens and magnets provided by UP’s Information Services unit; and buttons designed by our Digital Lab Coordinator José Velazco with three sayings: “I’m a Privacy Superhero,” “Bet You Can’t Guess My Password,” and “I Had a Digital Privacy Checkup Today.”

Compared with traditional drop-in workshops at which we’d feel lucky to have five attendees, this event reached many more people; for example, we gave out 50 zine-style instruction booklets about creating a strong password, and nearly 100 cards with the LibGuide address. We enjoyed the discussion with students about their privacy online, and their concerns or lack of concerns, as another benefit of this type of workshop. We are planning another event to observe International Data Privacy Day on January 28, 2020.

References

McElroy, K. (2018). Password 1234: How to use diceware to build a strong passphrase.      Library Freedom Institute. Retrieved from https://github.com/alisonLFP/libraryfreedominstitute/blob/master/assignments/week3/McElroy%20Week%203.pdf

Reinhold, A. (n.d.). The Diceware passphrase home page. Retrieved from http://world.std.com/~reinhold/diceware.html

Sullivan, M., Rainey, H., Cross, W., & Nakasone, S. (2018). Digital safety and privacy: Raising awareness through library outreach. Presentation at the Online Northwest conference, Portland, Oregon. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/onlinenorthwest/2018/presentations/11/

Witherspoon, R., & Taber, P. (2018). Student attendance at library workshops: What the data tells us. Presentation at the Workshop on Instruction in Library Use (WILU) conference, Ottawa, Ontario. Retrieved from http://ruor.uottawa.ca/handle/10393/37937

A Response to “Yes but…”

The following is a letter from Candise Branum, ACRL-Oregon President

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending the ACRL-Washington/Oregon Joint Conference at Pack Forest. The conference theme was Whiteness and Racism in Academic Libraries: Dismantling Structures of Oppression; I’ll write a separate review of my experiences at the conference in another article, but I left the conference feeling like I had some specific tools to confront microaggressions in the workplace and a bit more hopeful about the possibility of change in academic library culture.

And then less than a week later, the latest issue of OLA Quarterly was delivered to my inbox. The closing article, Yes, but… One Librarian’s Thoughts on Doing It Right was extremely disturbing; as many of our colleagues have already pointed out, the article diminishes the work, experiences, and knowledge that women of color provide in leading discussions of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (EDI), and instead centers the author’s own experience as a white woman as the “right way” to do this work. This is an inflammatory article, in which the author specifically names and critiques BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) scholars and allies for intentionally making white people feel bad and uninformed.

There is no excuse for this. We need to do better.

White librarians have to reckon with both our institutional and our own individual roles in white supremacy. Hosting White Nationalist groups explicitly puts the safety of our communities at risk; this is not a question of intellectual freedom, but of ensuring that our communities literally are not in fear for their well-being. As allies, white librarians must be the ones to step up and do the emotional labor of working towards racial justice, and not just waiting for our BIPOC colleagues to point out injustices; if we are passive or neutral, we are inherently supporting the racist, white supremacist status quo. There is no getting over this: the culture will not change unless white librarians force a change.

Since returning from Pack Forest, I’ve been doing some soul searching about my role in disrupting whiteness in both my personal life and my professional one. I’d like to explore how ACRL-Oregon as a body can propel the conversation forward in a community-driven and constructive way, and to build a network of librarians unified in doing work (not just making statements) towards racial justice. I obviously don’t have all the answers, but I do still have hope that our community will continue to grow together, and that we can work together in confronting white supremacy in our profession.

Some additional reading:

Candise Barnum
ACRL-Oregon President, 2019-2020

Congratulations to the Winners of the ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship

We are pleased to announce the recipients of funding for the current cycle of the ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship, which was created to foster collaboration between academic librarians and school librarians: Maureen Battistella of Southern Oregon University, and Carol Bailey of Eagle Point High School. Carol is a School Media Specialist and Maureen is an MLS librarian who has a faculty appointment in Southern Oregon University’s Sociology and Anthropology program.

 

They have three project goals:

  • to document new local history resources, including pioneer diaries, oral histories, historic photos and video, and to develop an Eagle Point Historic Resources Guide / finding aid for these resources;
  • to supplement instruction in Eagle Point High School teaching and learning;
  • to move an already-existing oral history workshop into an online course delivery environment, where it will be open to local museums, historical societies, public libraries, and schools at no cost.

Funding provided by this award will support Maureen and Carol’s work on this project, and will enable them to purchase microphones and tripods to support video and audio capabilities on already-existing iPads. They are planning to purchase the equipment in preparation for Eagle Point’s 2020 spring term; during the spring term, they will develop the Historic Resources Guide and the online workshop. They plan to be mostly completed with the project by the end of June 2020, with some online course testing and revision continuing through the summer. 

Our congratulations to Maureen Battistella and Carol Bailey. We wish you a successful collaboration and look forward to seeing your reports on the outcomes of this work!

Congratulations to ACRL-OR/WA 2019 Scholarship Winners!

Congratulations to Katherine McDonald and Tova Johnson who both recently received $155.00 scholarships from the ACRL-OR scholarship committee to cover registration costs for the 2019 ACRL-Oregon and Washington Joint Fall Conference. The conference is October 24-25, 2019 at the Pack Forest Conference Center in Eatonville, WA. The scholarship is designed for those who live and/or work in Oregon and more information can be found on the ACRL-OR Scholarships page.

Katherine is an MLIS student living in Clatsop County, Oregon. She volunteers as a tutor for Clatsop Community College’s literacy program, focusing on ESL (English as a Second Language) adult students. Katherine works to improve the dialogue and understanding towards the marginalized demographics of Clatsop County.

Tova is a Health Sciences librarian at OHSU (Oregon Health & Science University). She is looking forward to this conference because it addresses racism in academic libraries. Tova works to make academic libraries more diverse, inclusive and equitable for all.