• This site is the primary online presence for ACRL-Oregon, which serves a dual role as the Oregon chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) as well as the Academic Library Division of the Oregon Library Association (OLA).
  • ACRL logo
  • OLA logo
  • ACRL-Oregon logo
  • Categories

  • Archives

Call for OLA Conference Proposals – Due September 30

Tell Your Story

The Oregon Library Association Conference Committee invites you to submit program and pre-conference proposals for the 2016 Conference, April 20-22 at the Riverhouse Hotel in Bend.

Our theme this year is Tell Your Story.

“One of my favorite storytime books is Wait! I Want to Tell You a Story. It’s about a wombat that tells a story to a tiger to avoid being eaten. I like it because it’s really about the power of story. Stories can make you forget that you’re hungry or tired. They console us when we’re sad. Our stories are what make us who we are, as individuals, as institutions and as a society in general. It’s what connects us to each other. They’re how we learn. Basic and powerful.” – Jane Corry, OLA President 2015-2016

At this point the program does not have to be fully organized; you can give us a general idea of the program and speakers (if known), and fill in the other details on the proposal form. This year we are encouraging you to submit your ideas directly — no OLA Unit sponsorship is required. We also welcome proposals from OLA units. Sessions may be presentations, panels, or workshops. If your session idea does have any associated costs, it will still need a sponsoring unit.
Proposals are due by September 30.

Program Proposal Form – https://ola.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_202698

Preconference Proposal Form – https://ola.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_202697

Poster Proposal information and forms will be announced in November and due in January.

Questions? Please contact Michele Burke, Conference Program Committee Chair, by email at michele.burke@chemeketa.edu or by phone at 503.365-4711.

Many thanks from the program committee!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Michele Burke, Reference Librarian
Chemeketa Community College, Salem Campus
Office: 503.365-4711
Cell: 503.559-5518

ACRL-Oregon Invites Scholarship Applications for the 2015 WA/OR Joint Fall Conference

ACRL-Oregon has two different kinds of scholarships available for the upcoming 2015 ACRL-Washington & Oregon Joint Fall Conference. See below for more information and the application process and forms for both types of scholarships:


Library Paraprofessional/Support Staff Scholarship Applications

The Scholarship:

The ACRL Washington & Oregon Joint Fall Conference will be held at the Pack Forest Center for Sustainable Forestry in Eatonville, Washington on October 22-23, 2015. ACRL-OR will award up to two scholarships for library paraprofessionals/support staff; each completely covers registration and housing (dorm or cabin) and up to $50 in transportation costs.

Submission deadline is Wednesday, September 16, 2015.

The Criteria:

Applicants must be:

  • Library paraprofessionals/support staff
  • currently working in an Oregon library

The Application Process:

Complete the online application form (link below), which includes a written essay (250 words maximum), outlining your reasons for wanting to attend the conference and your interest in the conference theme of Forging Partnerships, Opening Doors.

Paraprofessional/Support Staff Scholarship Application Form


Librarian/Library Student Scholarship Applications

The Scholarship:

The ACRL Washington & Oregon Joint Fall Conference will be held at the Pack Forest Center for Sustainable Forestry in Eatonville, Washington on October 22-23, 2015. ACRL-OR will award up to two scholarships; each completely covers registration and housing (dorm or cabin).

Submission deadline is Wednesday, September 16, 2015.

The Criteria:

Applicants must be:

  • A member of OLA or willing to join before the conference
  • A librarian working in a library in Oregon or a student in an ALA-accredited library program who lives in Oregon
  • Preference given to first-time attendees of Fall Conference

The Application Process:

Complete the online application form (link below), which includes a written essay (250 words maximum), outlining your reasons for wanting to attend the conference and your interest in academic libraries.

Librarian/Library School Student Scholarship Application Form


The Deadline for All Scholarship Applications:

All scholarship applications are due September 16, 2015. Scholarship recipients will be announced by September 23, 2015.

Questions?

Uta Hussong-Christian, ACRL-Oregon President (2015-2016)
Oregon State University
Uta.hussong-christian@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7278

Announcing the 2015 ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence Winner

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence is a project-based award given annually to an individual or group whose project or initiative has significantly improved Oregon academic libraries or librarianship.

We are proud to announce this year’s award winner, John Schoppert, Director of Library Services at Columbia Gorge Community College (CGCC), for leading the Gorge Open (GO) Open Educational Resources (OER) project.

John Schoppert - The Dalles Chronicle

John Schoppert holds Open Source textbooks used at Columbia Gorge Community College. Photo by Mark Gibson, The Dalles Chronicle, 2015. Click photo for original source and related article.

Mr. Schoppert collaborated with CGCC administration, the distance learning coordinator, faculty, the bookstore manager, and advisors, and he sought the support of the CGCC Foundation. He designed an outreach program for faculty, which included seminars and presentations to departments, committees, and one-on-one consultations. These efforts helped raise the awareness of OER throughout the campus and created a groundswell of interest, which led to early adoption of OER into course curriculum.

Mr. Schoppert helped instructors integrate OER into the classroom, provided research support, and designed course assessments to improve the instructional design and to address student concerns about the OER alternative textbook program. Furthermore, Mr. Schoppert kept institutional interest high by engaging the administration, the board of education, and staff shareholders (the bookstore manager, advisors, etc.) and including them in the efforts of building OER courses. By engaging the administration, Mr. Schoppert created an overall awareness of OER, not only as it affected CGCC students, but also through connecting it to student success nationwide by alleviating burdensome textbook costs. By repeated presentations to administration, the board, and to the CGCC Foundation for financial support, the CGCC OER program was firmly established on the institutional level and integrated into the Student Success Plan and the Strategic Enrollment Management Plan, the two overarching management plans for CGCC student success.
Gorge Open icon

The final goal for Mr. Schoppert was to brand the OER program, and give OER classes a clear distinction in the CGCC schedule. Thus was born the GO – “Gorge Open” – brand icon, which corresponds with every course that uses OER each term. This icon allows student to know which courses would reduce their college expenses by not using a publisher’s textbook. Although somewhat controversial, it has proven effective as students are increasingly signing up for these classes.

As early adopters of using an OER icon in their schedules, CGCC was pleased to see the recent passage of Oregon House Bill 81 – the OER bill – which included the requirement of an icon in community college schedules to designate OER courses, along with the funding for OER adoption throughout the state. To date, CGCC has saved students over $61,000 in student textbook costs.

Congratulations again to John Schoppert, recipient of the 2015 ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence!

Please visit the Award for Excellence page for more info about the award, as well as for a list of past winners and projects.

Pre-Call: OLA 2016 Proposals due September 30th

Heads up! The deadline for OLA 2016 conference proposals will be September 30th!

This is a “pre-call” because we don’t have the submission form up just yet but we’ll have that linked at our 2016 Conference website when it’s ready.

The 2016 conference theme is “Tell Your Story”. Proposal descriptions are typically limited to 100 words. The hashtag is #ORLib16.

OLA Conference 2016 header

This year we’re trying something different. In the past, presenters had to be sponsored by an OLA division or roundtable. But how do you know which OLA unit to choose? And since most conference sessions don’t have a cost, what is the sponsorship for?

So this year we are encouraging you, our dear members, to submit your ideas directly — no sponsorship required. We still welcome proposals from OLA units, as well. Sessions can be presentations, panels, or workshops. If your session idea does have any associated costs, it will still need a sponsoring OLA unit.

So get those ideas generating and ready to go! More details coming soon.

Sara Q. Thompson
Conference Communications

ACRL IL Immersion 2015 experience

As mentioned last month, our very own Elizabeth Brookbank, ACRL-Oregon Public Universities Representative and Instruction Librarian at Western Oregon University, participated in the ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Teacher Track, August 2-7, 2015, in Seattle. Below, Elizabeth has captured her thoughts — and personal faves! — from the experience.


Since starting library school, I had heard other librarians talk about “Immersion.” It was always discussed as a sought-after and prestigious opportunity that was both deeply valued, but also sort of terrifying. Even so, many of the librarians I admire and think of as role models had participated in it. And so, upon hearing that it was being held in Seattle this year, and in my second year as an Instruction Librarian, I decided to apply for this mysterious experience called Immersion. I am so grateful that I did. (I am also tired. So, so tired.)

When they call it Immersion, they are not kidding. Every day started at 8:30 a.m. and most went until 8 or 9 p.m. That’s before the homework. This level of intensity, however, allowed for a depth of content that would not have been possible otherwise. The intensity of the experience also bonded the group together and started from the very beginning to create a learning community of trust.

It was an experience at times serious and at times lighthearted. This work-hard-but-have-fun environment was intentionally created and fostered by the faculty. They had a good sense of humor, and they let us see them as human beings, thus creating a mutual trust. They provided us with a mix of learning activities, some of them fun and whimsical, some of them challenging and thought-provoking, some of them all of the above. They thoughtfully guided us through discussions of some sticky topics and encouraged reflection at the end of each session. In short, they were excellent teachers. They modeled what they were teaching us and were transparent about how they planned and structured our learning experience so that we could replicate it as teachers ourselves.

Since there is no way I can fit everything I learned into one short blog post, I will instead give you my top 5 (plus 1) takeaways from Immersion 2015:

  1. Be intentional. There is never one right answer when it comes to how to teach, what to teach, how best to use your time, etc. Just make sure the choices you make are intentional.
  2. Challenge assumptions. About yourself as a teacher, about your students, about learning in general and what you are teaching specifically.
  3. Active verb + in order to + why phrase = a good learning outcome. The active verb should be developmentally appropriate and the “in order to” + why phrase should guide your assessment of that outcome.
  4. Activity does not equal active learning. Any learning activity can be active – even a lecture, if you ask students to reflect critically on it. Conversely, an activity does not ensure that active learning will happen.
  5. Talk about learning, not sources. Talking so much about “sources” divorces research from the learning process and experience for students. Instead of talking in your instruction sessions about the number of sources students have to find, talk about what they need to learn and how to use research to learn it.
  6. When engaged in intense intellectual work, eat every 2-3 hours. ;) Seriously, they fed us so much, but I lived for those snack breaks.

Another big highlight of Immersion for me was getting to soak up the wisdom of the imitable Deb Gilchrist. And so, my second list is a fan-girl homage to Deb.

Top 5 (plus 1) things I learned at Immersion from Deb Gilchrist:

  1. Don’t talk about anything in a session that you can put on a handout.
  2. A learning outcome doesn’t have to be measurable, but it does have to be judgeable.
  3. Make learning outcomes transferrable outside academia. You aren’t teaching to help students write their 10-page papers. You’re teaching to help them become informed, responsible, functional citizens of the world.
  4. Re assessment: Start small, but start!
  5. We should assess what we value, not value what can be easily assessed.
  6. Be intentional!

And finally, a selection of tweets:

So yes, Immersion was exhausting and overwhelming, but it was also absolutely inspiring. It has fundamentally shifted my perspective on teaching and being a librarian. To anyone considering whether or not to apply to the next program, I encourage you wholeheartedly to go for it.

And now, I’m off to take a nap!

~ Elizabeth Brookbank, ACRL-Oregon Public Universities Representative (2013-2015)
Instruction Librarian, Western Oregon University

REGISTRATION IS OPEN! ACRL Washington & Oregon Fall Conference, October 22-23, 2015

Registration for the 2015 ACRL Washington & Oregon Fall Conference is now open! We have an exciting and practical slate of professional development and networking activities planned. We hope to see you there.

Pack Forest cabins

ACRL Washington & Oregon Fall Conference 2015

Come network with colleagues, hear about ACRL National initiatives and opportunities, learn about new resources and initiatives at regional institutions, and get inspired in the beautiful retreat setting of Pack Forest!

Opening Keynote

The Washington State chapter is proud to welcome Susan Barnes Whyte as our keynote speaker for the 2015 conference.

Forging Partnerships, Opening Doors

Our theme for 2015 includes presentations on open access and open education; collaborative or shared efforts between libraries and with other organizations; libraries and librarians in the arenas of social justice, challenging oppression, and confronting bias; the changing contexts of our core missions of information literacy and information access; and navigating copyright, licensing, and fair use in providing content to our patrons.

For more info:

See you at Pack Forest,
Washington State Chapter of Association of College & Research Libraries

ACRL-Washington logo

ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Program

The highly successful and prestigious ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Program provides instruction librarians the opportunity to work intensively for several days on all aspects of information literacy. There are several tracks for the IL Immersion Program, including the Practical Management Track, the Program Track, the Teacher Track, the Assessment Track, the Intentional Teaching Track, and the Teaching with Technology Track.

Our very own Elizabeth Brookbank, ACRL-Oregon Public Universities Representative (2013-2015) and Instruction Librarian at Western Oregon University, will be participating in the Immersion Teacher Track, which is scheduled for August 2-7, 2015, in Seattle.

The Teacher Track “focuses on individual development for those who are interested in refreshing, enhancing, or extending their individual instruction skills. Curriculum includes classroom techniques, learning theory, leadership, and assessment framed in the context of information literacy.”

When Elizabeth returns, she will write a post about her Immersion experience.

Stay tuned!


Several of our ACRL-Oregon members have been accepted into the ACRL Information Literacy Immersion Program throughout the years. If you have attended an Immersion Program, please leave a comment and share your experiences!

REMINDER: Call for Nominations for ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence

**All nominations are due July 22, 2015**

Do you know someone (or a group of someones) that has worked on a project or initiative in the past few years that has made a difference for Oregon academic libraries? If so, please consider nominating them for the ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence (https://ola.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_197772)! See below for more information:

What it is:

The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence is a project-based award given annually to an individual or group whose project or initiative has significantly improved Oregon academic libraries or librarianship. The award will be presented at the ACRL-Oregon/Washington Fall Conference in Eatonville, WA (Pack Forest Conference Center), October 22-23, 2015, and the winner(s) will also be recognized at the Oregon Library Association Annual Conference Award Ceremony in Bend (April 20-22, 2016). The winner(s) receive registration to the ACRL Oregon/Washington Joint Fall Conference and an engraved plaque.

For a list of previous award winners, visit our website at http://acrloregon.org/acrl-oregon-award-for-excellence/.

Who can be nominated:

Any individual or group that includes at least one employee of an academic library in Oregon may apply/be nominated. Nominations are kept active for two years, so an individual/group that is nominated this year, but does not win, will be considered again next year unless withdrawn by the nominator. The initiative or project that is the basis of the nomination must have occurred in the previous three years. This is not a lifetime achievement award, and ACRL-OR membership is not required to win this award.

Nomination form: https://ola.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=form_197772

Deadline: Nominations must be received by July 22, 2015.

Questions: Please contact Isaac Gilman, ACRL-Oregon Past President, gilmani@pacificu.edu

Best,
The ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence Committee

Interview with Jackie Ray, Blue Mountain Community College

In an effort to help OR ACRL members to get to know our colleagues from around the state, Board Member Arlene Weible recently interviewed two community college library directors who are new to their positions.

In this second of two posts, meet Jackie Ray, Director of Library and Media Services at Blue Mountain Community College in Pendleton, Oregon.

1. Tell us a little bit about your work background.

Jackie Ray photo

Personal picture submitted by Jackie Ray

Jackie has a work history that has taken her both near and far from the Northwest. Originally from Washington State, she started at UW-Bothell as a library technician, and then moved to Oregon where she took a summer gig as a park ranger at Heceta Head Lighthouse in Oregon. She then worked as a Reference Assistant at Linn-Benton Community College and as an adjunct Librarian at Lane Community College before moving on to become the Learning Resources Center Director at Klamath Community College. Jackie decided to adventure around the country and left the state for several years with stints as the Head of Access Services in universities in New Hampshire and San Francisco. She has landed back in Oregon at Blue Mountain Community College about six months ago where she assumed the role of Director of Library and Media Services. She and her husband, both native Northwesterners, are happy to be back in Oregon.

2. What has been the best thing that has happened to you since you started your position?

Jackie is very proud of the library’s increased awareness in the library’s role in projects from Achieving the Dream to Assessment. Blue Mountain was selected to be a participant in the ACRL Assessment in Action program. This program provides training and grant support for the promotion of assessment activities on campus. It has been a great opportunity to work with faculty and administration across the college to develop an assessment program that specifically targets Information Literacy outcomes across the curriculum and delivery of IL instruction both for on-campus and distance education students. Having recently passed accreditation, Blue Mountain is using their involvement in Assessment in Action tools as one of the tools leveraging their strategic planning activities. The outcome of this project will be presented at a poster session at the ALA Annual Conference 2016 in Orlando, Florida.

Blue Mountain also hosted an OER conference earlier this spring and along with other community colleges has made great strides in expanding OER in the academic community. Jackie, with help from a grant from Openoregon.org, is also working closely with Eastern Promise faculty to develop an OER textbook for U.S. History courses that can be used both in the local high schools and at the community college.

3. What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

After replacing a long-term director, Jackie has been challenged by upgrading and promoting the library’s image and services on campus. Blue Mountain has a great old building, but it needs upgrading to reflect the needs of local students. Jackie has observed that student still rely on college-provided technology rather than personal devices, and is optimistic in the Blue Mountain’s investment into an Academic Resource Center (ARC) in the library, equipped with laptops and other media production tools that will be open to both students and faculty. Jackie successfully lobbied for increased funding to acquire more library databases and will be collaborating with other departments to create a more learner-driven environment in the library and in other departments.

4. What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

Blue Mountain has a lot of potential and because of recent funding is in a great position to improve on all that we have, along with a vital “students first” attitude that is constantly being reinvigorated in our campus culture. Blue Mountain is at this time the only community college involved in the WICHE Interstate Passport program whose intent is to develop a two-year degree that is transferrable among seven states. Jackie served on a development team for establishing IL and Critical Thinking Outcomes. The Blue Mountain Community College Library strives for outreach, and hosts events that include a local artist gallery and writers’ readout which is a great resource for the Pendleton community.

Jackie Ray photo

Personal picture submitted by Jackie Ray

5. What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about you?

Jackie’s professional interests include assessment, information literacy and instructional design and equity, particularly in distance learning.

She loves the outdoors, cooking, and dreams of owning a petting zoo. In the meantime she is a more regular animal lover and volunteers at the local animal shelter, PAWS.


~Arlene Weible, ACRL-Oregon State Library Representative (2013-2015)
Electronic Services Consultant
Library Development Services
Oregon State Library

Interview with Mark Petersen, Klamath Community College

In an effort to help ACRL-Oregon members to get to know our colleagues from around the state, Board Member Arlene Weible recently interviewed two community college library directors who are new to their positions.

Mark Petersen picture

Personal picture submitted by Mark Petersen

In this post, meet Mark Petersen, Learning Resource Center Director at Klamath Community College in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

1. Tell us a little bit about your work background.

Like many people, I started out as a child. I am originally from Springfield, Oregon, and graduated from the University of Oregon in 1998 with a Bachelor’s degree in history and absolutely no idea what to do with the rest of my life.

I spent the next 9 years working a wide variety of jobs (dishwasher, line cook, graveyard shift at 7-11, welder…) before returning to graduate school to earn my MLS in 2009.

2. How long have you been in your position?

I have been library director at Klamath Community College since October of 2014. Prior to that I worked as a reference and instruction librarian at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, and as a part-time reference librarian at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

3. What has been the best thing that has happened to you since you started your position?

I’d have to say the best thing professionally that has happened to me in the past year has been adding Robin Jeffrey to the staff at the KCC Library.

The library at KCC has only 2 full-time employees, and when I took over directorship the other position was still vacant. I spent the first 6 months or so working solo, trying my best to fulfill the duties of both positions while searching for the right person to fill the vacant position, and as soon as I met Robin for her interview I knew that she was that “right” person.

Robin is an absolute rock star, and I don’t know what I’d do without her. She has a natural gift for the profession, and it’s often hard for me to believe that this is her first job out of her MLS program. I think she’s going to do great things!

4. What is the biggest challenge facing your library in the upcoming year?

The biggest challenge facing this library has been its lack of presence on campus. There has been an enormous turnover in library staff, including multiple directors, during the past ten years that has resulted in the library being seriously neglected. When I took over in October, neither students nor staff were used to coming into the library for help, and that is a difficult pattern to change.

Both myself and Robin, the other librarian here at KCC, have been working very hard this past year to change this with, I am happy to say, great success. We have developed an information literacy instruction program from scratch that has been growing by about 200% a term, we have increased traffic and use of the library by about 400%, increased hours of operation by 10%, grown the print collection by over 30% and have seen great progress in developing faculty interest and use of Open Educational Resources.

5. What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about your institution?

KCC has such an incredible diversity! I never would have expected it before I moved down here, but there is an amazingly broad spectrum of society represented by the student body both in terms of racial and cultural diversity, as well as socio-economic diversity.

6. What would you like Oregon academic librarians to know about you?

When I’m not practicing librarianism, I spend my time Cuban salsa dancing, cooking and, more to the point, eating amazing food and riding bikes.

~Arlene Weible, ACRL-Oregon State Library Representative (2013-2015)
Electronic Services Consultant
Library Development Services
Oregon State Library

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 41 other followers