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OSU Undergraduate Research and Writing Studio wins ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award

Undergrad Research and Writing Studio Awardees

The Oregon State University Libraries and Press (OSULP) has been awarded the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award for 2019 for their Undergraduate Research and Writing Studio. Opened in 2017, the Studio provides a place for undergraduate students to work on writing projects and receive assistance with writing and research from trained peers. The Studio is a collaboration between the Writing Center and the OSULP. The implementation and ongoing steering team includes Writing Center and OSULP staff, including: Dennis Bennett, Chris Ervin, and Vanessa Petroj from the Writing Center and Anne-Marie Deitering, Beth Filar Williams, Uta Hussong-Christian, Hannah Gascho Rempel and Jane Nichols from the library.

The award includes recognition in the C&RL News, a plaque, and $3000.

ACRL-OR was able to ask a few questions of the team. Their answers are provided below (ACRL also published a short interview).

Our heartiest congratulations to OSULP and to the implementation team on this prestigious award. Read on for some of their comments.

Who or what was the driving force behind creating the Studio?

Jane: There was a pressing need for more space for the writing center because they were outgrowing their space. At the same time there was a rising idea of reclaiming and re-invigorating the space where tutoring was happening in the library, the Collaborative Learning Center (CLC). The library had been aware of the trend of library – writing center partnerships and locating the campus writing center in the library. The Associate University Librarian for Learning Spaces, Anne-Marie Deitering, and the Writing Center Director, Dennis Bennett, began talking about partnering with an eye towards addressing respective service goals centered on student learning and success. As discussions progressed, the idea to move into the library gained traction and was approved by senior leadership by both the library and the writing center. Following this, a team was tasked with carrying out the project.

An important foundation to the relationship is the creation of a Memorandum of Understanding which outlines various aspects of the terms of agreement and includes substantive calls for the partners to collaborate on issues such as learning outcomes, service design, assessment, and training.

What was the collaboration process like between librarians, writing center staff, and media specialists?

Beth Filar Williams and Uta Hussong-Christian: The nine months we all worked together on the implementation team was truly a collaborative process. Over the duration of our well-organized and facilitated bi-weekly meetings, we used a service design process to develop a shared holistic student-focused framework for the project. In the process of working through space and service concepts and eventually plans, we learned a lot about each other as individuals and about what our respective units did. This helped us compromise in ways that worked for everyone. By the time the space opened, we had laid the groundwork for our partnership as we went through the ups and downs of the first year (and beyond) of Research & Writing Studio operations.

What did writing center folks learn about the library/librarians that was new to them and what did librarians learn about writing center folks that was new to them?

Jane Nichols: As librarians we were unfamiliar with the extensive training, much of it focused on theory and pedagogical concepts, that the student writing consultants received. We appreciated seeing the consultants be open to learning about the theoretical foundations to their work.

Chris Ervin: Something I already knew as an experienced academic is that there is more happening within other disciplines than those of us who are disciplinary outsiders understand. Working alongside librarians and in the physical space of the library has shown me some of the inner workings of the discipline of librarianship, in particular where those inner workings come into contact with the Studio. For example, we in writing centers and writing studies don’t tend to think of the work we do as “service,” but rather as teaching and mentoring. There’s even a debate within our discipline about whether to consider first-year writing as a “service course” (in service to the other disciplines) or as an introduction to the discipline of writing studies. Librarians, however, often use language like that—service points, service models, etc., but I understand better what that means now. The “information seeking process” that’s iterative is very much like our studio pedagogy approach, also iterative. Librarians must suffer a fundamental misunderstanding (from the public, students, faculty) of the work they do, just like writing center professionals. One place that misunderstanding comes into the Studio is in what students think of the role of our research consultants. Students, I believe, want to see the research consultant’s role as serving their information needs rather than teaching them skills that will help them meet their own information needs. As a writing center professional whose priority is facilitating student learning through teaching (classroom or one-to-one), I see the potential for research consultants to practice the studio pedagogy we associate with writing consultations—the process-focused, metacognitive kinds of conversations that would encourage research writers to investigate their own research processes and to advance their information literacy skills.

What do you see as the next steps for the Studio?

Beth: I would like to continue to grow the partnership and iterate as we learn more from assessment. I hope we can integrate Student Mulitmedia Services better maybe in an adjacent space? And I hope we get a better referral process to library liaisons and to other resources.

What are you all going to use the $3000 for?

Chris: The four members of the Studio Steering Committee have agreed that the funds will be used mostly or fully to support the Studio’s food pantry. Because Oregon State University’s students, like college students around the country, wrestle with food indsecurity, we created a pantry in the Studio for our student staff. The $3000 will be used to stock the pantry for at least a year, possibly more.

Hannah, this comes on the heels of you being selected as the ACRL IS Featured Teaching Librarian in 2018. Is it safe to say you’re now a library rock star?

Hannah: Hannah who? In other news, tickets are on sale now for my upcoming world-wide tour “Curiouser and Curiouser.”

Anything else you want the Oregon academic library community to know about this award or about the Studio?

Beth: We welcome visitors and conversation as we grow our knowledge, our services, and learn about best practices.

It’s not too late! ACRL-OR professional development scholarship

Applications for ACRL-OR’s professional development scholarship will be accepted through July 31. Don’t delay; get your application in now!

ACRL-OR is pleased to offer a scholarship up to $250 to cover expenses related to an eligible professional development activity. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) annual conference as a director representing the Association of Independent Colleges of Art
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Meredith Farkas
acrlor@olaweb.org

 

Garrett Trott: ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship Reflection

I just finished up John Maxwell’s online course entitled “Developing the Leader Within You.” I really wanted to take this course for several reasons, one of them having to do with some of the changes that Corban University is going through. There has been discussion of the library moving to a new building.  I was hoping that this course might enable me to lead better through that process.  While the discussion really has not developed since I applied for the scholarship (that is, there really is no more or no less certainty that moving will actually take place), I can say that this online course really developed me in several facets.

If I had to point out two particular areas where I feel I learned the most they would be as follows:

  • Attitude really makes a huge difference in many facets of life, including leadership.  In this particular context of potentially moving to a new building, seeing it as an opportunity to expand and develop the services which the library offers and not simply focusing on the work it will take to get there (and it does have potential to be a lot of work) or what can go wrong, really helps the scenario tremendously.  The VPs who are in charge of this transition see my attitude and their eagerness to provide us with what we need is in large part reflective of the attitude I carry through this scenario.
  • Personal/professional development needs to be planned out with a goal of where I want to be.  I have always enjoyed many facets of both professional and personal development, but they have often been only for the sake of the development itself, not necessarily for the sake of developing as a leader.  If I can focus on developing skills that will aid me in this particular scenario, it can be a great asset.  For example, one area that I am working on developing is my skills in conflict resolution.  I do not do this simply so I can learn, but because of the likeliness that these skills can be utilized as we discuss moving the library.

Thanks to ACRL-OR for the professional development scholarship that allowed me to take this excellent online course.

Garrett Trott
Library director, Corban University

Professional Development Scholarship Announcement:

ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a new round of Professional Development Scholarship awards. We are currently soliciting applications for the July 31 deadline for a scholarship up to $250. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) annual conference as a director representing the Association of Independent Colleges of Art
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Meredith Farkas
acrlor@olaweb.org

Congratulations to ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship Winner

Garrett Trott headshot

Garrett Trott, Library Director , Corban University

ACRL-OR is happy to announce the awarding of a professional development scholarship to Garrett Trott, library director at Corban University in Salem. Garrett was recently promoted to library director and will use the scholarship funds to partially offset the cost of an online course on “Developing the Leader Within You.” Garrett will be taking this course to improve his “relational intelligence” and to help him transition from “an individual focused on production … to an individual focused on people development,” as he makes the transition from a front line librarian to library director. Garrett will apply what he learns in this course to more effectively lead the library through some university-wide changes under discussion. Look for a future ACRL-OR blog post from Garrett sharing his experiences and insight gained following completion of this course.

Our congratulations to Garrett!

 

Congratulations to the Winners of the ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship

We are pleased to announce the recipients of funding for the current cycle of the ACRL-Oregon School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship: Sally Mielke of Eastern Oregon University, and Sherry Loennig of North Powder Charter School. This scholarship was created to foster collaboration between academic librarians and school librarians.

Photo of Sally Mielke

Sally Mielke, Eastern Oregon University

Their project goals are to increase student access to online resources and assistance in the North Powder Charter School library, and also to increase students’ information literacy skills. Prior to Ms. Loennig’s recent hire, North Powder had no dedicated librarian. Students have not been receiving information literacy instruction, and there is no computer workstation for searching library resources available to students in their library. The North Powder School District superintendent has asked Ms. Loennig to meet with North Powder teachers to address school library standards and information literacy instruction.

Photograph of Sherry Loennig

Sherry Loennig, North Powder Charter School

Funding provided by this award will allow for the purchase of a computer for students to access in their library, with a librarian present to provide assistance and instruction in finding and evaluating information resources. Ms. Mielke will provide a workshop on teaching information literacy for Ms. Loennig and three of North Powder’s teachers in late Spring or early Summer 2019. During the summer of 2019 Mss. Mielke and Loennig will work with these three teachers to prepare research guides on specific subject areas, to be ready in time for the opening of the 2019/20 school year. These teachers, with the assistance of Ms. Loennig, will then be able to integrate information literacy instruction into their classes. The research guides will be posted to the School Site Academic Page so that students and families can find and access the resources easily when at home or other locations.

Their project supports these Oregon School Library Standards:

LIB 1.1.C Develop, select, clarify, and use questions and strategies to search for information

LIB 1.1.D Find, evaluate and select appropriate sources to answer questions

LIB 3.2.A Consider a variety of balanced and authoritative sources

LIB 4.1.A Find, evaluate and select appropriate digital resources to answer questions

LIB 4.1.C Evaluate digital information sources for accuracy, validity, importance and bias

Our congratulations to Sally Mielke and Sherry Loennig. We look forward to your successful collaboration and to seeing the outcomes of this work!

Apply Now: ARCL-OR Professional Development Scholarship

Looking for a way to pay for OLA-WLA? ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a new round of Professional Development Scholarship awards. Thanks to a matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $500 for each award for the 2019-2020 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the March 3 deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences (including, but not limited to, OLA-WLA), workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, – Art Libraries Society of North America conference
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright


Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2018-2019 year:

  • March 3
  • April 30
  • November 30 (done)

For more information, contact the ACRL-OR Board President:

Steve Silver
Northwest Christian University
ssilver@nwcu.edu
acrlor@olaweb.org

Apply Now for the ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship

ACRL-Oregon is delighted to announce a new round of Professional Development Scholarship awards. Thanks to a matching-fund grant from the State Library of Oregon, ACRL-Oregon is able to offer up to $500 for each award for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. Applications are accepted at three points throughout the year (see below for specific deadlines); we are currently soliciting applications for the December 7 deadline. Applications will be reviewed within two weeks after the application deadline.

How can the scholarship be used?  

The ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship may be used toward conferences, workshops, courses, seminars, or other learning opportunities (including e-learning opportunities) appropriate to the applicant. The funding priority is registration and transportation costs incurred by the applicant.

For examples of how past recipients have used their awards, see these posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

  • Serenity Ibsen, – Art Libraries Society of North America conference
  • Kim Olson-Charles, Personal Librarian and First-Year Experience conference
  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, American Association for State and Local History conference, presentation on digital collections of local history
  • Kate Rubick, ACRL national conference, panel presentation on library-faculty teaching collaboration using BEAM
  • Darci Adolf, e-course on copyright

Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All ACRL-Oregon members in good standing.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Professional Development Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon.

Who is not eligible?

Non ACRL-Oregon members.

How will applications be evaluated?

Please visit our FAQ page, which contains our evaluation rubrics and answers to frequently asked questions.

How do I apply?

Apply for the scholarship using this online form.

Deadline:

Applications will be accepted at three points throughout the 2017-2018 year:

  • February 28
  • April 30
  • December 7

 

2018 ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence Winner: Oregon Association for School Libraries (OASL) Learning Goals Project

The ACRL-Oregon Board is proud to award this year’s ACRL-Oregon Award for Excellence to the Oregon Association for School Libraries (OASL) Learning Goals project.

ACRL OR President Presenting Award for Excellence

ACRL-OR President Meredith Farakas presenting the 2018 Award for Excellence to Pam Kessinger

In 2016, the Oregon Association of School Librarians Standards Committee was directed by the OASL Board to write Grade Level Learning Goals for each standard and indicator of the Oregon School Library Standards. The committee wrote Grade Level Learning Goals for grades K-14 tied to the Standards, but also connected to the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy and the Common Core Standards. The initial writing was completed in the spring of 2017. A rewrite based on extensive feedback and the development of supporting documents is in process.

The Grade Level Learning Goals not only outline the sequence of Information Literacy skills that should be taught in grades K-12, they also include what should be taught in grades 13-14 to accommodate the learning goals of high school students enrolled in dual credit or college prep classes. They provide a granular and easy-to-follow roadmap for teaching information literacy not only for school librarians and library technicians, but for K-12 teachers and lower-division college faculty. It scaffolds a student’s learning and development of information literacy skills throughout a student’s time in school.

Apply Today for the School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarships

ACRL-OR seeks to foster collaboration between academic librarians and school librarians. The role of school librarians is vitally important and is in many ways interrelated with the work of academic librarians and the students we all serve. Up to $1,000 is available per year for this scholarship. Applications will be reviewed at two points during the year–or until the money runs out.

How can the scholarship be used?

This funding opportunity covers any collaboration between at least one school librarian and at least one academic librarian that the applicant(s) can make a good case for. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Sponsorship to attend, exhibit, or present at a relevant conference (OASL, regional conferences, or others)
  • Creation of programming, such as a conference, workshop, unconference, or pre-conference
  • Work on a collaborative research project
  • Something else we haven’t thought of!

For examples of past awards, see the following posts on the ACRL-Oregon blog:

Note: Professional Development Scholarships will not be awarded for ACRL-OR/WA Fall Conference attendance as this annual event has its own scholarships.

Who is eligible?

  • All Oregon academic and school librarians
  • Preference will be given to teams that include at least one ACRL-Oregon member in good standing
  • Preference will also be given to applicants who have not previously received a School/Academic Librarian Collaboration Scholarship from ACRL-Oregon

Who is not eligible?

Academic and school librarians outside of Oregon (unless part of a team of collaborators that includes at least one Oregon librarian).

How will applications be evaluated?

Reviewers will look for applications that:

  • Have at least one applicant who is a member of ACRL-Oregon
  • Demonstrate meaningful collaboration between school and academic librarians
  • Have the potential to favorably influence information literacy awareness/education in Oregon

Deadlines:

  • First round due November 16, 5:00pm
  • Second round deadline TBA if there is still scholarship funding to be awarded

How to apply:

Follow the scholarship application link to access the application.