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Congratulations to ACRL-OR Professional Development Scholarship Winner

Garrett Trott headshot

Garrett Trott, Library Director , Corban University

ACRL-OR is happy to announce the awarding of a professional development scholarship to Garrett Trott, library director at Corban University in Salem. Garrett was recently promoted to library director and will use the scholarship funds to partially offset the cost of an online course on “Developing the Leader Within You.” Garrett will be taking this course to improve his “relational intelligence” and to help him transition from “an individual focused on production … to an individual focused on people development,” as he makes the transition from a front line librarian to library director. Garrett will apply what he learns in this course to more effectively lead the library through some university-wide changes under discussion. Look for a future ACRL-OR blog post from Garrett sharing his experiences and insight gained following completion of this course.

Our congratulations to Garrett!

 

Outreach on Campus: Library Resources for Staff

Lightbulb clip artAcademic librarians spend most of their time working with faculty and students to promote library services. With all the attention these groups require, it is easy to overlook campus support staff as potential users of library resources and advocates for library services. Staff providing student and financial services, grounds or building maintenance, administrative support, or food service may not be obvious library users, but you might be surprised about their information needs and the resources you might have to help them.

LearningExpress Library is a resource provided to Oregon libraries by the Statewide Database Licensing Program. It provides standardized test preparation materials, career and employment resources, computer and other skill building tutorials. In many ways, this resource has something for everyone, and this point was brought home to me at a training session the State Library provided at a community college campus. Hoping to boost attendance at the session, the local librarian sent out an invitation to all campus staff. While it was not surprising to see staff from the student services office attend the training, we were delighted to see general administrative staff and maintenance staff also show up.

Student services staff were interested in career placement and assessment tools available, and well as skill building tutorial available in math, reading, grammar and writing for the students they worked with. The administrative staff member was looking for resources to help her daughter study for the SAT and was also excited to see the job search tools available through Job and Career Accelerator. The maintenance staff member was looking for opportunities for self-improvement and was thrilled to see tutorials for Excel and Adobe Photoshop. It’s a librarian’s dream to get resources into the hands of users when they need them, and this session really inspired me to think about the value of LearningExpress Library as tool for outreach beyond the usual library user groups.

If campus staff feel that the library is welcoming source of information and support in their own lives, they are certainly more likely to spread the word to the faculty and students they interact with every day. Consider cultivating these untapped library champions as part of your outreach strategy.

Please contact Arlene Weible to arrange a training session for your campus.

Arlene Weible
Electronic Services Consultant
State Library of Oregon

Join ACRL-Oregon for a free webinar on library assessment

ACRL-Oregon is piloting offering webinars on topics relevant to academic library workers. Members and non-members alike are welcome to join us.

Our second webinar is entitled “Geek out, don’t freak out: How to chill out and learn to love assessment” and will be presented by librarians Colleen Sanders of Clackamas Community College and Meredith Farkas of Portland Community College on Wednesday, February 27th from 10-11am Pacific.

Assessment is such a valuable tool to help learn more about our patrons, demonstrate the value of what we do, and improve our teaching. So why is it so difficult to build an assessment culture in library instruction programs? Often, resistance to and anxiety about assessment come from common causes that have been both discussed in the literature and illustrated in our own experiences. Meredith and Colleen will talk about their experiences working with nascent assessment programs at their libraries, the projects they’ve worked on, and what they’ve learned from trial and sometimes error. They will discuss ways that librarians can move past resistance and anxiety to reap the benefits of an assessment culture.

Registration is open to any Oregon library staff, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/848284084394267c7510d14dfea9e911

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available to registrants after the live broadcast.

Past Webinars:

On January 11th, ACRL-Oregon held its first pilot webinar on Critical Library Management! Here is the link to the archived webinar so you can watch it at your convenience: http://bit.ly/acrl-or-jan19. You can also access  Candise Branum and Molly Gunderson’s slides separately. It was a terrific webinar with tips relevant to library workers wherever they are in their organizational hierarchy.

If you do view the webinar, we’d very much appreciate it if you’d provide feedback to us via our evaluation form — it should only take a moment:  https://goo.gl/forms/IHHpC0HpVPRKgP4o2

Questions about our webinar pilot can be directed to ACRL-Oregon President Meredith Farkas at acrlor@olaweb.org.

Sign up for OLA Preconference “Copyright Outreach, Education, and Advocacy on Campus”

ACRL-OR is proud to sponsor a preconference at this year’s joint OLA/WLA Conference! Please consider signing up for Copyright Outreach, Education, and Advocacy on Campus when you register for this year’s conference.

Academic library staff often have formal or informal copyright responsibilities on their campuses. Whether you are charged with creating copyright education for your campus community or just want some tools to chip away at the misinformation regarding copyright that you encounter from staff, students, and faculty, this interactive workshop is designed to help you design copyright outreach efforts that will work. Participants will leave with plans to either begin or extend copyright-related outreach from whatever role they occupy at their institution.

This preconference workshop is presented by Rachel Bridgewater from Portland Community College; Sue Kunda from Western Oregon University; and Patrick Wohlmut from Linfield College and takes place Wednesday, April 17th, from 8:30am – 12:30pm.

 

Register for the ACRL-OR Inaugural Webinar!

ACRL-Oregon is piloting offering webinars on topics relevant to academic library workers. While this may become a member benefit, for the pilot period, we are opening the webinars up to any Oregon library staff who wish to participate.

Our first webinar is titled “Critical Library Management” and will be presented by Candise Branum, Director of Library Services at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine and Molly Gunderson, Access Services Manager at Portland State University on Friday, January 11th from 2-3pm PCT.

Critical Library Management

Oregon libraries work to meet the information needs of our communities, a mission that is dependent on teamwork. Library managers are tasked with leading, supporting and developing the teams that serve our communities. Social justice and critical theory are frameworks that are often discussed within library practice, but are only starting to be applied to library management practice. The more we discuss social justice, the more apparent it is that inclusion and equity are essential aspects of library management. The goal is for audience members to think critically about their own management practice and consider ways of improving equity and in their own organizations.

Register Now

Registration is open to any Oregon library staff, but we are limited to 100 attendees in the session, so register soon: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/5b1e973165ad47f54ac87b605f06faf5

We also plan to record the webinar and make it available on our website after the live broadcast.

Questions about our webinar pilot can be directed to ACRL-Oregon President Meredith Farkas at acrlor@olaweb.org.

 

What I Did This Summer: Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians

This post was written by Stephanie Debner, one of the recipients of an ACRL-Oregon Professional Development Scholarship this year. In this post, she reflects on the professional development opportunity that was supported with this award.

Thanks to receiving a professional development scholarship from ACRL-Oregon, well as funding from the Pacific Northwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, I was able to attend Supporting Clinical Care: An Institute in Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Health Sciences Library in Aurora, CO this July. This institute is an intensive three-day learning experience that focuses on the skills that health sciences/medical librarians need to support evidence-based practice. It combines large-group lectures and activities with lots of small group sessions that focus on hands-on learning and discussion.

This institute was an invaluable learning opportunity for me. I teach a class that focuses on the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) and literature research skills in the College of Chiropractic at University of Western States. This class is the first in a series of EBP classes that the chiropractic students take, and is foundational to their understanding of EBP principles and starting to think clinically. While I had familiarized myself with the concepts that I have been teaching, this institute really allowed me to take a deep dive into the concepts and putting them into practice. My first action item for bringing this learning back to my institution is to retool this class for the next time I teach it in winter term 2019. I also expect this learning to inform changes that I make to one-shot sessions in other EBP classes.

One key focus of the institute was on critical appraisal of research evidence, with a focus on randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews. I realized that this content would be particularly valuable to bring back to the UWS library, as we work with chiropractic students who have critically appraised topic assignments in the beginning of their clinical training. I plan to develop a resource to share with my colleagues that will help us to work with students on this assignment more effectively.

Not only did I have the opportunity to learn from the institute’s tutors, many of whom have years of experience with this institute and in teaching EBP, but I also had the opportunity to learn from my fellow attendees, many of whom are experience medical or health sciences librarians. Through small group sessions and talking with colleagues who participate in systematic review teams at their institutions, I picked up tips and skills for doing better literature searches to support faculty research interests at my own institution.

An additional benefit from the institute pertains to my own teaching. Since one of the purposes of the institute is training librarians to feel comfortable in teaching EBP at their institutions, there was also a focus on modeling different teaching methods and activities to teach this content. I noted several different ideas to bring back to the classroom, particularly ways that would facilitate class participation and on-the-fly assessment of student learning. One of these ideas was lower-tech: giving each student three different emoji on half-sheets of paper that they could hold up to indicate opinions on specific questions, and that the instruction could use to facilitate conversations about those opinions. Another idea was a little more high-tech: the use of Plickers to get real-time data from students, without the need for clickers or having the students go to a specific website. Good stuff!

Many thanks to ACRL-Oregon for supporting this opportunity and to the State Library of Oregon for the matching professional development funds that doubled the funds available to me from ACRL-Oregon.

 

Register now for ACRL Preconference Sessions at OLA

ACRL-Oregon is sponsoring two preconference sessions  at this year’s Oregon Library Association Conference  that will be of interest to academic librarians across the state!  The preconference sessions are from 8am-5pm, Wednesday, April 18th in Eugene, OR.  Please consider signing up for one or both of them!

8am-12noon

Southern Oregon University faculty member Maureen Flanagan Battistella will lead a preconference sharing How to Document Oregon’s Thousand Points of Life: Techniques and Technologies to Engage Your Community Using an Oral History Project with a fantastic panel of university faculty and librarians. You can check out their Stories of Southern Oregon digital collection where they collected their local oral histories.

1pm-5pm

Portland Community College librarian Pam Kessinger will lead a panel along with faculty from PCC’s Developmental Education program to explore Metacognition and Reading Strategies to Bridge Students Toward Inquiry. Librarians will learn how to use the Reading Apprenticeship framework as well as our own ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to develop meaningful information literacy instruction and student reflection. This session is co-sponsored with the Library Instruction Round Table.

Can’t make the whole conference?  Did you know you can sign up for OLA preconferences without paying to attend the full OLA Conference? Take advantage of attending one or both of the preconference sessions ($55 per session) and then, (lucky you!)  Join your ACRL colleagues from 5:00-7:00pm for the ACRL-Oregon Reception at the First National Taphouse. We hope to see you there!

Sign up to attend ACRL-Oregon-sponsored Preconferences at OLA

OLA Conference posterACRL-Oregon is sponsoring two Preconferences at the Oregon Library Association Conference that will be of interest to academic librarians across the state. Please consider signing up for one or both of them!

Portland Community College librarian Pam Kessinger will be leading a panel with faculty from PCC’s Developmental Education program to explore “Metacognition and Reading Strategies to Bridge Students Toward Inquiry.” Librarians who teach will learn how the Reading Apprenticeship framework as well as our own ACRL Framework for Information Literacy can be used to develop meaningful information literacy instruction. This session is co-sponsored with the Library Instruction Round Table. 

In August 2017, ACRL-Oregon awarded Maureen Flanagan Battistella a professional development award to attend the American Association of State and Local History conference. Maureen’s attendance there was part of an ongoing project in partnership with colleagues at Southern Oregon University, Hannon Library, Jackson County Library, and others to  create “unique digital collections that tell the stories of Southern Oregon.”

Interested in learning more about Maureen’s research and how to engage your own community via an oral history project? Sign up to attend the pre-conference session she is leading, “How to Document Oregon’s Thousand Points of Life: Techniques and Technologies to Engage Your Community Using an Oral History Project” with a fantastic panel of university faculty and librarians.

Interested in having your own conference, workshop, or professional development project funded? Apply for an ACRL-Oregon professional development award now! Deadline for next consideration is February 28, 2018.

 

Incorporating Mindfulness Into My Teaching

Hi! I’m Meredith Farkas, ACRL-Oregon’s VP/President-Elect and a librarian at Portland Community College. Like many of my colleagues on the ACRL-OR Board, I attended the ACRL-PNW Conference at Pack Forest in October. For me, the highlight of the conference was a session entitled “Contemplative Pedagogy: An Ancient Solution for a Modern Problem” presented by Nicole Gustavsen of UW-Bothell/Cascadia College and Heather Newcomer of Olympic College. The session described mindfulness practice and how it can benefit us — both professionally and personally — and our students in our continuous-partial-attention-driven, technology-filled world. Nicole and Heather had attendees participate in a breath and body guided mindfulness exercise and then described how they used mindfulness exercises at the start of some of their classes and the benefits of doing so. You can view their slides as well as their list of resources which include the breath and body scan script they used with conference attendees.

Title Slide from Contemplative Pedagogy Presentation

I was inspired by the idea of using brief (2-5 minute) mindfulness exercises at the start of class to better connect with students and help them focus on what we’re doing. I recognize the challenges we have as librarians in building rapport within the context of a one-shot instruction session and this activity seemed like a small change I could make that might help students see that I recognize research can be challenging and am here to support them. That week, I had a Reading 115 class coming in and I thought this would be the perfect group to try this with because a lot of students I’ve worked with in Reading 115 classes in the past have had issues with self-confidence around their academic abilities. I hoped that this might bring their stress level down or at least help them let go temporarily of some of the other things on their minds.

I made a few minor changes to the breath and body scan script Heather and Nicole used so it would fit my own presentation style and then tried it with the class. When I first came into the classroom, students were chatting, texting, sending emails, and all the usual things we see students doing before class. I started by introducing myself and talking a bit about how research can be stressful, how I’m here to support them in that, and that we’re going to do a quick breathing exercise to help us focus on the task at hand. As I read the script, every student participated and the room was silent. Once I’d finished, I found that the class was focused in a way I’d never seen before in my teaching. I don’t know whether or not it brought students’ stress levels down, but it definitely facilitated a solid transition between what they were doing before and what we were all working on together. I also found that when I gave students time in the second half of class to work on their own research, more students in the class asked me for help than usually do. Whether that was a fluke or they really felt more comfortable seeking help from me after the exercise I don’t know for sure, but I feel like it was well worth sacrificing a few minutes of class time to do.

Space Slide from Mindfulness Presentation

Winter term has recently started at Portland Community College, and I’m excited to start more of my classes this term with a breath and body scan. It’s always exciting to go to a conference and be able to apply something from it to your own work, and I want to thank Heather, Nicole, and the ACRL-WA Board for providing us with the opportunity to learn all this!

 

Free professional development for health and medical information

With the start of a new year, many people make health-related resolutions. I’d like to propose one such resolution for the new year: be (and help our students be) more health literate.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine logoA few months ago, I started a new position at the University of Western States, which specializes in programs in integrative health care. I quickly became aware of trainings available from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). A hat tip goes to Laura Zeigen at OHSU for suggesting that this would be good information for a blog post!

I participated in a six-part webinar series on PubMed for Librarians, an invaluable (and free!) training series. Each online session was an hour long, so it was convenient to fit it into my schedule. It was an excellent professional development opportunity that paid off immediately in my day-to-day work.

In general, the trainings cover a wide variety of topics and from the perspective of working with different patron populations. My only regret was not knowing about these trainings sooner; they would have been valuable in working with health professions students at area community colleges.

The NNLM also provides targeted resources for evaluating health websites and conducting the consumer health reference interview, including ethical concerns.

Know the Science logo

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health logoAnother great health resource is the Know the Science series from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). It has interactive modules, videos, and tutorials that help users understand complex scientific topics related to health research and become more health literate. There are a number of resources about understanding complementary health care, dietary supplements, and unpacking the concept of natural medicines. In a state like Oregon, where so many people use complementary and integrative health care, the resources from NCCIH are highly relevant and useful.

Stephanie Debner
University of Western States